$10 catch can install

edizzle89

Registered Member
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Columbus, IN
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I just got finished installing a catch can on my 2009 4.6 Genesis and I figured I would share how I did it if anyone else wanted to see.

So I've found that air-water separators for air compressors make great catch cans, mainly because they are cheap and have a fine brass filter/screen in them which is great at grabbing the oil vapors out of the crankcase before entering the intake manifold. I previously had one from Lowes ($35) on my old big turbo 300zx and it worked great. This time I am trying out the separator from Harbor Freight ($10).

For anyone wanting to understand how the air-water separators work here's a good picture showing it.

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Here is the separator from Harbor Freight I used this time, but pretty much any separator should work.

3/8 in. Compact Air Filter

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For the 4.6 (not sure about 3.8 or 5.0) you'll need about 2 feet of 3/8 hose and 2 feet of 15/32 hose, I got 3 feet of each just to make sure I had enough but I think 2 feet would have been fine. Also you must use fuel hose or PCV hose as the crankcase vapors can eat through vacuum and coolant hoses, also make sure you have all the hose clamps you'll need. the 3/8 is for the PCV side of the system and the 15/32 is for the intake side of the system. You will also need barb fittings with any angles you want for however you decide to route your lines. The separator is 3/8 NPT with bushing to go to 1/4 NPT so you can use either size.

Here is everything I had laid out when I started, I already had the fittings in the separator at this time. Make sure when putting all your fittings together to use thread tape on the threads and get them good and tight so they dont leak out any oil or let in any air. One thing I didnt get any pictures of is sealing the valve at the bottom of the bowl (you can see the metal fitting at the bottom of the clear bowl). This needs to be sealed off so it wont leak as it's not designed to be under vacuum like it will be in this application., there are several ways to do it but I basically covered it with a healthy layer of oil-friendly RTV.

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Next I drilled and tapped a hole for a m8 bolt in the top of the separator housing so that I could mount it to the bracket I made. There are 4 holes in the housing for m4 bolts if i remember right, but I wanted to keep my bracket small so I went for a single m8 bolt. Make sure you clean the housing out really well after drilling and tapping to make sure no metal shavings are left in there. Make sure to put thread tape on the m8 bolt as it goes into the separator and could cause a vacuum leak if not sealed well. Also make sure to put your fittings on the right sides of the separator. The PCV side (3/8 hose) should go to the 'inlet' of the separator and the intake side (15/32 hose) should go to the 'outlet' side so that the air going through it comes in/goes out in the correct direction.

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After that was done I mounted my bracket onto the car. You want to make sure you mount it high enough that you can still get the bowl down and off when draining the oil. I used 2 short self-tapping screws to mount it to the wheelwell, this spot will only work if you have a cone filter style intake.

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I was then able to mount the catch can and run my lines.

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edizzle89

Registered Member
111
32
28
Columbus, IN
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I also made a 180* piece with a couple of fittings for the line coming off of the PCV valve as I didnt like how much of a bend I had to have in the hose to make it work.

IMG_0236.JPG


I had to adjust the line routing a little here and there and try a few things but I was able to get the lines to fit under the engine cover and come out the side without having to do any trimming. I also made sure to securely zip-tie all my lines so they couldn't move around to prevent them rubbing on anything.

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Overall I'm pretty happy with how it turned out and I'm interested in how much it will catch on my 192k mile engine. As for total investment I only have about $22 into everything, with the separator being $10 and the hoses about $12. I was able to get all my fittings and clamps from work for free and the bracket is a piece of aluminum angle I had laying around from past projects. But I would imagine you could do everything the same way I did for $40 or less. I'm pretty confident that there is no other catch can on the market that will work as well as this with everything you need for less than $40.
 

Mr. Incredible

SUSTAINING MEMBER
1,626
454
83
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G80 Sport
so I have to ask, how much oil do you catch..

I've used catch cans in the past.. on my 2005 Chrysler 300c SRT it was defiantly needed, I would empty the 4oz can 2-3 times between oil changes (5k-7K miles)

In my 2010 Avalanche with the 5.3L it was also needed, there was a known oil blow-by issue with the 5.3L motor from 2000-2013, PCV valve replacement was recommended every 24 months, most cars it is 48-60 months.

In my 2012 Camaro SS (6.2L) and my 2015 RCF (5.0L) there was no need, zero blow-by in either car after 36K miles.

on the 3.3T in my G80 sport I think there might be a need, forced induction tends to create more blow-by than NA motors. though I haven't ventured into putting one in yet.
 

edizzle89

Registered Member
111
32
28
Columbus, IN
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I just installed it last night so I'll give it a few weeks before I check it and report back. But how i see it is if it even catches 1oz between oil changes it's that much less oil in the intake manifold where is doesn't belong.
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Mr. Incredible

SUSTAINING MEMBER
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Genesis G80 Sport
I just installed it last night so I'll give it a few weeks before I check it and report back. But how i see it is if it even catches 1oz between oil changes it's that much less oil in the intake manifold where is doesn't belong.

I agree, in my RCF after 36K not a single drop made it in, other RCF owners that put them on reported the same thing, Lexus did a very good job of designing the system that the PCV did it's job and kept it out of the intake.
 

Spanky61

Been here awhile...
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Most G80 5.0 Tau V-8's have less the 1% fuel Dilution which is considered a trace. So it's not something that's truly required or needed.
 

edizzle89

Registered Member
111
32
28
Columbus, IN
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Most G80 5.0 Tau V-8's have less the 1% fuel Dilution which is considered a trace. So it's not something that's truly required or needed.
It's not fuel that is entirely the issue. Some of the problem is the regular oil vapors that the PCV system can pull out and then feed into the intake manifold, that is one of the major causes of carbon build up in direct injected engines. but even port injected engines can get a carbon build up from the oil being put through the intake.
 

Mr. Incredible

SUSTAINING MEMBER
1,626
454
83
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G80 Sport
It's not fuel that is entirely the issue. Some of the problem is the regular oil vapors that the PCV system can pull out and then feed into the intake manifold, that is one of the major causes of carbon build up in direct injected engines. but even port injected engines can get a carbon build up from the oil being put through the intake.

And forced induction engines tend to have a lot more oil blow by then NA motors. But even modern NA motors can be really bad depending on the design, Chrysler motors and some GM NA motors as I noted above have horrible issues with it.


All one has to do is to look at ones throttle bottle flap after 8-10k miles and if it is black with build up you have a blow by issue.

As I said my 5.3L Avalanche was horrible. The 6.2L Camaro and the 5.0L RCF not a drop on the t-body flap in 36k miles.
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Spanky61

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You're welcome to believe what you choose but it does work, especially for those that are utilizing their 5.0 for short daily trips.
 

NSXNEXT

Registered Member
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You're welcome to believe what you choose but it does work, especially for those that are utilizing their 5.0 for short daily trips.
Facts are facts.

The main cause of carbon buildup on the backs of valves is detergents and fuel don't come in direct contact with the outside of the intake valves. In a DI engine fuel is injected directly into cylinders instead of a place behind the valve.

So what exactly burns those deposits off? Heat? No, that's just baking it on even more. There are only a few ways to get the deposits off

1) removing the heads and walnut shell blasting the valves
2) use a product like CRC GDI intake valve cleaner.

CRC is introduced through the intake manifold to clean the backs of the valves, the same place oil blowby is introduced, which is what it causing the deposits.

As per this thread you could add a catch can to eliminate blowby altogether.
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Spanky61

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Adding a catch can won't eliminate it. This is already been proven time and time again. You're just buying into the snake oil. Do what you like and I'm completely familiar with how a GDI engines works. Thanks for the refresher.

Yes the facts are the facts. Blow-by as you call it, is diluted fuel and oil which is recycled to be re-burnt in the cylinder from the emissions system. Diluted fuel and oil blows by the rings. With a fuel dilution of less than 1%, (lab tested) which is a trace, there's no problem.

BB Intake & Valve and Combustion Cleaner , Sea Foam, and Chevron Techron work far better than CRC by miles. Thanks again, but I've been doing this for decades. However, a much bigger problem is injector clogging and happens way before you need to remove carbon off the back side of the valves.

With the short intake exhaust and filter the OP's utilizing, he's doing far more damage to the valves, throttle body, map sensor and rings, then the carbon/diluted oil you're attempting to catch in a make shift catch can will ever do.:hillarious: Plus, adding a catch can is a big no, no for anyone on still under a factory warranty. You certainly aren't doing anything similar are you with the intake and ......? Hope not.

Do you understand what a PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation Valve) does, where the recycled oil comes from, along with what you tap into for a catch can? Like I said with (oil lab testing) fuel/oil dilution @ less than 1% in the 5.0 Tau, you simply don't need it. Looking at the OP's motor, he's well outside warranty which generally means over 60K miles. If he's just now adding a make shift catch can, it's not going to help anything or circumvent any carbon buildup on the valves that's already there. He's simply a day late and a dollar short, literally.:roflmao:

Walnut blasting carbon from the back of the valves, is usually done at 55-60K if needed at all. By the way it looks, he's well past that, so is your R-Spec 2013. Either way, it's a moot point but keep drinking the Kool Aid, it's good for you.:rolf: . You're certainly not the first and won't be the last by far to drink it.:good:. If it makes you feel better, than go ahead it's your money to waste.

Have fun but what you spend on snake oil, can provide the needy or homeless several meals, a coat or shoes, they can always use. Peace!
 
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edizzle89

Registered Member
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Columbus, IN
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Adding a catch can won't eliminate it. This is already been proven time and time again. You're just buying into the snake oil. Do what you like and I'm completely familiar with how a GDI engines works. Thanks for the refresher.

Blow-by as you call it is diluted fuel and oil which is recycled to be re-burnt in the cylinder from the emissions system. diluted fuel and oil blows by the rings. With a fuel dilution of less than 1%, (lab tested) which is a trace there's no problem.

Sea Foam and Techron works better than CRC by miles. Thanks again, I've been doing this for years. However a much bigger problem is injector clogging and happen way before you need to remit carbon off the back side of the valves.

However, with the short intake exhaust and filter the op's utilizing, he's doing far more damage to the valves, throttle body, map sensor and rings, then the carbon/ diluted oil you're attempting to catch in a make shift catch can will ever do.:hillarious: Plus, adding a catch can is a big no, no for anyone on still under a factory warranty.

Do you understand what a PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) does and where the recycled oil comes from? With fuel/oil dilution at less than 1% in the 5.0 Tau, you simply don't need it. Looking at the OP's motor, he's well outside warranty which generally means over 60K miles. If he's are just now adding a make shift catch can, it's not going to do anything or circumvent any carbon buildup on the valves that's already there. He's simply a day late and a dollar short, literally.

Walnut blasting carbon from the back of the valves is usually done at 56-60K if needed at all. By the way it looks, he's well past that. So is your R-Spec 2013. Either way it's a moot point.
Its a 4.6 so not DI so I'm not having any of those issues. It has 192k miles so my intake,exhaust, and filter must really be doing sooooo much internal damage lol

At the end of the day any oil in the intake manifold is bad, so even if it catches half of what's going in there then it's better than before. Plus even if a catch can doesn't Catch anything at all there are still zero negative side-effects, so for $22 it's not hurting anything, not even my wallet
 

Spanky61

Been here awhile...
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Like I said, $22.00 can go allot further to actually help someone in need, then to waste.

Make sure it doesn't have a vacuum leaking. In the event that it is or does, it most certainly will cause engine problems.

My point had already been made; If you're just now adding it with 192K miles and haven't needed to keep the valves clean, then you're not going to need in the next 60K, if it lasts that long. Understand!

So why waste the $22.00? Put it to work from someone else, where it makes a real difference.

Just a though! Maybe not, it's your's to waste. Just saying!

Peace
 
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edizzle89

Registered Member
111
32
28
Columbus, IN
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I have a quick update on how the catch can is doing. It's been 2 weeks since the install and it looks like it's caught some oily condensation which is about what I would expect this time of year. But it seems to be doing a decent enough job for $10 and it's that much less crap going into my intake manifold.

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Like I said, $22.00 can go allot further to actually help someone in need, then to waste.

So why waste the $22.00? Put it to work from someone else, where it makes a real difference.

Just a though! Maybe not, it's your's to waste. Just saying!

Peace
If you're going to judge people about how they choose to "waste" their money rather than just donate it then how about you sell your G80 and Kona, go buy a $5000 car that will still get you from point A to point B no different then your current vehicles, then use the money you were spending on your car payments and donate that?

Or just keep "wasting" your money on your current cars, it's yours to waste. Just saying!
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Flarfignewton

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Pittsburgh, PA
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I stand by putting a catch can on 100%, it's been proven on countless platforms to help keep not only the intake valves but the entire intake tract free from oil blowby. Much harder to remove oil from the intake manifold. If anything, the older your engine gets the more it will benefit from one as more engine wear equals more blowby. Seeing this thread has made me realize I have my catch can hooked to the wrong hose so I'll have to fix that soon.
 

Ducatislave

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42
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Georgetown, TX
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I have seen first hand that catch cans and oil separators work. In particular on my wife's '13 sonata. We had to install one since she kept getting a code thrown after taking a hard left turn or a left u-turn(we both drive like cops). Being as the crankcase vent is on the passenger side of the engine what was happening was that all the returning oil from the valve-train was being slung over to the vent outlet and gradually getting sucked into the intake. This in turn would get oil onto and in the MAP sensor and throw a code. It was also consuming about 1.5 quarts between scheduled oil changes. After its third trip to back to the dealer (it was still under warranty) they said something to my wife about the amount of oil in the bottom of the intake manifold. So I figured I would throw a catch can on it and see if that didn't fix it. Not even a week had gone by and I looked at the collection bowl, damned if it wasn't already half full, almost no water mostly with oil. On long road trips, especially in areas of high humidity I get a bunch oily water accumulated in the bowl, which is proof enough for me that they work.
 
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Ducatislave

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Georgetown, TX
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Wow sounds like there are issues with that engine. Did they pull the heads to look for bad valve seals?
No they haven't pulled the head, however when they pulled the intake this last time they used a bore-scope camera to check for just that. They told my wife that apart from the normal carbon buildup on the back of the valve itself, that the stems were clean and dry on all of the intake valves. so unless it is leaking on the exhaust side, which should cause smoking since it is not being compressed and ignited, the PCV overflowing is the only logical explanation.

Additionally the engine runs great, even when it did throw that code. It is always smooth as glass, never a hiccup or shudder. I think (personal opinion) that the primary issue in this instance is that there are either; not enough oil return passages from the valve-train to the pan or, the return passages are too small for the grade of oil that they recommend.

Regardless, the catch can fixed the problem and it stops the oil from getting sucked back into the intake.
 
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