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2.0 or 3.8?

genesis8326

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Hi. I want to buy this car (2013 Genesis coupe r spec); I like it, but I don't know what engine to choose? Any advise?
 
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interrex

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3,8 is the no brainer. 2.0 down the road will not have enough ponies so you will want to start to tinker. Turbo lag and boost will get in your veins so you will open your wallet for about 50 more horse. But to get 50 more horse it is going to cost $2500.. And you still will have lag and boost problems...2.0 was designed for the gas mileage. No one leaves the turbo alone so it ends up costing them.. 3.8 is easier to sell down the road where a turbo is not..But if you do buy a Hyundai be prepared to keep for the long haul. The reputation of the product is not socially excepted yet. It has not a proven track record yet..
 

Madduxman3104

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I just purchased the 2.0T R-Spec. I am very happy with the power. Not everyone wants to tinker with engines and make upgrades. I have no intention of doing so with my car. After a good open road run, I am impressed with the pull of the turbo. Yes, there is turbo lag. That will be in most turbos. For the price, I do not think I went wrong.

BTW, one article I read in Car and Driver prior to making my purchase stated that both the 2.0T and 3.8L V6 have a governor allowing a top speed of 146. So, if you intend on going mach 3 in either, be forewarned. Guess you could find a way to have that changed.
 
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genesis8326

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Thank you guys for the answers. I made the question because I test drove both the 2.0 and the 3.8 and to be honest I think I felt almost the same power on both. At first I had my mind set on a 3.8 but when I tested the 2.0 it got me thinking. Could this be because the 2.0 puts out its 275 lb/ft of torque at just 2000 rpm? (according to specs)
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interrex

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When you open the exhaust up on the 3.8 it screams. The 3.8 is a dual over head cam motor, wants you let it breath with a kn filter and a cross dual exhaust it flows..
 

Madduxman3104

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genesis8326....I want everyone to know that I am NOT insulting anyone by my next statements. It's just common knowledge.

When you have any car or truck that has multiple engines and various goodies, there is always a debate over which is the best choice of engine. I'm from the deep south. Yes, redneck world. When I was growing up it was trucks that were the big draw. What could they pull? Which tranny was best, which rear-end was best, tires, and blah, blah, freaking blah. With that being said. It's easy for someone who has the model with the most horses and the most CC's to speak highly of that model and to (in some cases) bash the versions that have a smaller engine and lesser suspensions and convenience packages. I have been on the site for less than a week and I can see that on here already.

Not everyone has money to buy the most expensive version of the vehicle they want. That's why car manufacturers are smarter than people who bash them. They realize people can get the same car with a different, and yes, sometimes, less powerful engine. Same great looks and appeal. Truth be known, guess if we had the money we would all be in Ferrari's instead of low to medium cost sports cars. You can buy eight or nine 2.0 R-Specs for the cost of one Ferrari.

Happy with my 2013 2.0T R-Spec. The cost of a new 3.8 R-Spec is just a bit more than I can handle on bill day. Not because of just payments, but because of the insurance increase. Maybe one day I will graduate to big boy status. When my son can take my car and I then get a new one.
 

yellow3.8track

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Either one may suit you just fine.

I've always been leery of turbo cars because the turbo is harder on the engine components.

Don't believe it? The oil change frequency is less in the turbo 4 cylinder than in the 6 cylinder. To me that says engine operating conditions breaks down the oil faster, requiring more frequent changes.

I've got the V6. I like it. I didn't even drive the turbo 4 cylinder to see what it was like (hell, I didn't even test drive a V6 model before I bought the one I have).

Good luck with which ever one you choose.
 

genesis8326

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Thank you all again for the answers!!
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yellow3.8track

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Either one may suit you just fine.

I've always been leery of turbo cars because the turbo is harder on the engine components.

Don't believe it? The oil change frequency is less in the turbo 4 cylinder than in the 6 cylinder. To me that says engine operating conditions breaks down the oil faster, requiring more frequent changes.

I've got the V6. I like it. I didn't even drive the turbo 4 cylinder to see what it was like (hell, I didn't even test drive a V6 model before I bought the one I have).

Good luck with which ever one you choose.
Darn. Reread that and realized it should have said either miles between oil changes is less with the turbo 4 or it should have said the required oil changes are at a higher frequency than the V6 engines.

The older I get the more "space" there is between what I said/typed and what I think I said/typed. I've already told my wife to "just get used to it" since it will only get worse.;)
 

interrex

Registered Member
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I have changed turbo on a PT cruiser with less than 60. 000 miles because the oil gets hot and breaks down faster. You have to use a good quality oil when running a turbo or the bearings freeze up from the heat. that is what happen to the PT cruiser, the bearings in the turbo froze up. If you do not have a lift to change it , it takes all day because it is back behind the firewall. Up and down like a yo yo removing parts to get to it.. Engine compartments are just to small for some application with turbos ..
 

mikec

Registered Member
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SoCal
Sometimes a smaller-engined car feels as peppy as the bigger-engine variant due to gearing changes. I don't know about the Genesis coupes; the sedans though do use different differential gearing that gives the V6 some help, making it almost as quick as the V8 from a standing start. The highway acceleration/passing power though still favor the V8. On the sedans, the V8 cruises highways at lower RPMs than the V6 because of this gearing. And the V8 versions have a higher top speed potential - both because of the gearing and more available total horsepower.

Turbos: they can last as long as the rest of the engine with a few basic guidelines. One end of the turbo gets blasted by engine exhaust - clearly VERY hot. That's hundreds of degrees while the engine idles or putt-putts at low power as you drive in your residential neighborhood streets... and 1500 to 1600 degrees when you floor it. It's common for the exhaust side of a turbo to have a bit of a glow after a long drive, especially a "spirited" drive or a run through the mountains. That's 1000+ degrees. Things that help a turbo live longer:

1: ideally the turbo is cooled by engine coolant too. Many early turbo cars, or less expensive cars, relied on the oil to cool the turbo. Not a very good setup in general. It's cheaper to make though. Engine coolant flowing around the guts of the turbo will keep the delicate bearings cooler - around 200-300 degrees. The 1000+ degree exhaust side of the turbo will still be that hot, but at least that heat won't soak through the whole turbo as long as water flows.

2: turbos operate at very high RPMs... and take a while to coast down to low RPMs. Revving the engine just before you shut it off spins the turbo up to high RPMs and then starves it of oil when the engine is turned off ==> very bad. And yet very common, especially with younger folks. Ideally you'd let the engine idle or loaf at low power for a bit (a minute or two) before shutting the engine off. This gives the turbo a chance to spool down AND it lets the cooling system knock the turbo temps down a bit. Even an oil-cooled turbo will benefit from a minute or two of engine idle. That idle time gives the 1000+ degree hot side a chance to cool down a couple hundred degrees while oil is still flowing through the bearings; then when the engine is off and thus there is no more oil flow the hot-side has cooled a bit so there will be less heat to soak through the rest of the turbo.

3: synthetic oils generally have a higher temperature tolerance than dino oil. Quality oils are better than cheap oils too. Over-heated oil "cokes" into a hard varnish-like layer that gums up the turbo bearings.

edit: getting physical access to a turbo is often a nightmare job. Especially on a FWD engine like interrex described. Take a look at a VW with the 1.8 or 2.0 turbo engine... my neighbor has one. It took me several minutes to FIND the turbo it's so buried in there. Eventually I could point out ONE mounting nut (of 4); the other 3 were totally invisible. To change that blown turbo my neighbor had to remove the front of the car and a lot of engine stuff. On my 1988 Starion (a RWD vehicle) the turbo is in plain site, easy to access. I can remove it in about 15 minutes if necessary. It's never needed replacement; though I have removed it on other Starion/Conquests when removing the engine for heavy maintenance. (I pull the whole engine because it's actually easy on Starions/Conquests compared to leaning over the fenders to do clutches, timing chains, etc at the 100K service interval)

mike c.
 

Top Gear

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3,8 is the no brainer. 2.0 down the road will not have enough ponies so you will want to start to tinker. Turbo lag and boost will get in your veins so you will open your wallet for about 50 more horse. But to get 50 more horse it is going to cost $2500.. And you still will have lag and boost problems...2.0 was designed for the gas mileage. No one leaves the turbo alone so it ends up costing them.. 3.8 is easier to sell down the road where a turbo is not...
This one comment, which I agree with, made my jaw drop :) I've been saying these same things over on the other popular Genesis Coupe forum and have been shouted down by a dozen guys at a time, including a moderator, because they have some strange problem with engine facts and displacement science. Sorry, just had to say thanks, interrex :grouphug:
I just purchased the 2.0T R-Spec. I am very happy with the power. Not everyone wants to tinker with engines and make upgrades...
This is also true.

The question, genesis8326, is how you drive and what turns you on. If you're into "import tuning", the 2.0T has more of a younger community really into that. Yet, you will have to spend a lot of money and void the warranty to beat the 3.8 R-Spec when you see one, while it will be stock and fully covered. The I4 can be modded up for surprising power if you don't care about the warranty, but you'll be blowing smoke and needing a rebuild sooner than you want. The all-aluminum V6 has more raw power and grunt, with a minor increase in weight, but that helps eliminate understeer. If you're older or have had fast cars, and if you drive hard and want the faster model, the 2.0T will feel too slow too soon after purchase. With the 3.8, I've yet to think it needed to be faster, and the cars I look to play with on the road are muscle cars and supercars. The R-Spec is about 200 pounds lighter than the GT/Track, and I've also read the Coupe's 2.0 is a Hyundai Sonata engine, while the V6 and V8 are newer or separate Genesis engines, so if you're like me and think of Genesis like the Acura, Lexus and Infinity upscale brands, it means a little something to have a Genesis engine in a Genesis car. Also, you certainly can get a turbo, a twin turbo, or a supercharger for the V6 and mod it up, making the argument even more moot regarding the "tuner" stuff.

Hope all that helps you decide :)
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BTY

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Thank you guys for the answers. I made the question because I test drove both the 2.0 and the 3.8 and to be honest I think I felt almost the same power on both. At first I had my mind set on a 3.8 but when I tested the 2.0 it got me thinking. Could this be because the 2.0 puts out its 275 lb/ft of torque at just 2000 rpm? (according to specs)
I completely agree with you. I was also dead set on the 3.8 until I test drove the 2.0 as well. On paper, yes, the torque peaks at 2,000rpm on the 2.0, but you wont really feel the turbo kicking in until about 3,000rpm.

What's your opinion on everything else in regards to the 2.0 vs the 3.8?

I find that the 2.0 is a smoother, less bumpy ride. It also handles corners better as well.
 

G-696313

I completely agree with you. I was also dead set on the 3.8 until I test drove the 2.0 as well. On paper, yes, the torque peaks at 2,000rpm on the 2.0, but you wont really feel the turbo kicking in until about 3,000rpm.

What's your opinion on everything else in regards to the 2.0 vs the 3.8?

I find that the 2.0 is a smoother, less bumpy ride. It also handles corners better as well.
What about 3.3 by turbo? Not sure if that is only in full sized and not coupe? Would have to be faster.. I wish my daughter wasn't 14. I still need a back seat. Coupe is ok people cheaper faster. Guessing corners handles bettenib. r than the full sized genesis.
 

G-990590

Please ignore what the above person wrote. They have a 3.8 and trying to make themselves feel better. The 3.8 has almost maxed at potential, it being a NA you cant tune and the addons you put on the engine wont net any gains worth noticing unless you pump 5-10 grand into it to make it forced induction and then if you dont do it right or forge your engine you could just grenade it. Since the 3.8 is literally an old SUV engine.

The 2.0T will easily surpass WHP of the 3.8 with just a tune. Now add your bolt ons ect and your way past what the max potential of a 3.8 is for a quarter of the cost.

The Theta II is a beast if awoken and dont worry you will love the boost and feel the car gives when the turbo is screaming.
 
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