2015 Genesis Tech Package - Front turn signal bulb blown - LED Replacement?

John F. Tamburo

Hasn't posted much yet...
Hi -

Manual says that the replacement for my blown front turn signal bulb is a PY28W (I do not have LED turn signal bulbs). Internet says that 1157 is compatible.

Question: would this LED replacement bulb work and has anyone tried it or something similar? I am uninterested in drilling holes into the package as another older thread suggested...

https://www.pepboys.com/product/details/867670/00514

Thanks for any information.

John.

2015 Genesis Tech Pkg Pamplona Red beige int - (BRING THIS COLOR BACK FOR THE G80 AND OFFER IT ON G90!!!! It's not a car unless it's red! :eek: )
 

John F. Tamburo

Hasn't posted much yet...
Well I threw $20 bucks at it and picked up a set. The verdict is still coming in. Observations:

1. You have to remove the plastic cowl cover to reach the RH bulb, and even then it is an exercise in contortion to get to it.
2. The LH bulb is VERY easy to reach and change , even without dismantling the vehicle.
3. The LH bulb did not work although it tested ok with the package's "try me" button.
4. The RH bulb did not initially work but then mysteriously it started to do so. It is brighter and better looking than the original incandescent bulb.

I intend to disassemble the car again this evening and try to troubleshoot the LH bulb issue.

Any pointers will be appreciated. These bulbs are supposed to have the necessary resistors built in.

Thanks,
John
 

John F. Tamburo

Hasn't posted much yet...
OK, Final report...

They work!!!

The problem before was that the new bulbs have "bumps" on the bottom that are not as long, and also that the contact in the socket was a tad oxidized. A quick lift with a small screwdriver and a little scratching to clean the contact, and all was well. It took the car about 5 seconds of the turn signal "blinking fast" to accommodate to the new LED bulbs, and then after that all was well.

The new LED are significantly brighter than the cheapo incandescent bulbs, and the turn signals have that "fast on" LED look and completely fill in the light since the bulb has LEDs on the top and the sides. I used Amber, but if you want a different look, the bulbs come in white and blue as well. I was going to post a short video showing the bulbs in DRL and turn-signal mode; I may do so in the next day or so.

In short, if you want a $20 upgrade that feels much more expensive, this is about a complexity of 3.5 on a scale of 1-10.

Next project: Building a plug-n-play adapter that will reassign the DRL to the halo-leds around the headlamp and still leave the turn signals where they are. Based on the wiring I saw today, that may be a bit of a challenge. However, the idea I am shooting for is:

1. Unplug headlight assembly plug
2. Plug into adapter box
3. Plug adapter box into headlight
4. All Done!

Thanks!!

John.
 
Last edited:

MNgen

Registered Member
41
2
8
Minneapolis
May not make a difference, but the front turn signal bulbs are a 2357. The only difference being the turn signal flash or brake light is much brighter than the 1157. Bulb life is significantly shorter with the incandescent 2357 due to the additional heat.
______________________________
 

John F. Tamburo

Hasn't posted much yet...
May not make a difference, but the front turn signal bulbs are a 2357. The only difference being the turn signal flash or brake light is much brighter than the 1157. Bulb life is significantly shorter with the incandescent 2357 due to the additional heat.
Thanks for the heads-up! I will see if there is a 2357 LED compatible light and if it is brighter than the Pilot 1157 compatible. This LED seems brighter than the cheapo incandescent bulbs but it can't hurt to check.

Thanks!!
John.
 

2015g5.0

Registered Member
Where did you get the (right) bulbs and are they still working well? I asked the dealer (after the 4th burned out) to swap to LED they won't do it - claiming it messes up the electrical....
 

AggieAloha

Hasn't posted much yet...
15
2
3
Dallas, TX
OK, Final report...

They work!!!

The problem before was that the new bulbs have "bumps" on the bottom that are not as long, and also that the contact in the socket was a tad oxidized. A quick lift with a small screwdriver and a little scratching to clean the contact, and all was well. It took the car about 5 seconds of the turn signal "blinking fast" to accommodate to the new LED bulbs, and then after that all was well.

The new LED are significantly brighter than the cheapo incandescent bulbs, and the turn signals have that "fast on" LED look and completely fill in the light since the bulb has LEDs on the top and the sides. I used Amber, but if you want a different look, the bulbs come in white and blue as well. I was going to post a short video showing the bulbs in DRL and turn-signal mode; I may do so in the next day or so.

In short, if you want a $20 upgrade that feels much more expensive, this is about a complexity of 3.5 on a scale of 1-10.

Next project: Building a plug-n-play adapter that will reassign the DRL to the halo-leds around the headlamp and still leave the turn signals where they are. Based on the wiring I saw today, that may be a bit of a challenge. However, the idea I am shooting for is:

1. Unplug headlight assembly plug
2. Plug into adapter box
3. Plug adapter box into headlight
4. All Done!

Thanks!!

John.
Just wanted to follow up on your post for pictures, possible links, update on install, and any updates on your PNP adapter. Interested in the thread you started. TIA and cheers!
 

Mathi

Getting familiar with the group...
31
2
8
TN
Thanks John for a very nice thread. This is a change that I am very interested in doing. Keep us posted on the DRL from LED halo conversion. Why in the world didn't Hyundai do it this way instead of using a turn signal bulb for double-duty? Oh well, looks like you're going to fix it.

Edit: I just ordered these in white. I will post my opinion of them after installation.
______________________________
 
Last edited:

diamondmit

Hasn't posted much yet...
17
3
0
I replaced the DRL 1157 bulbs with simple LED's - great change....easy....needed to add resistors to eliminate rapid signal flashing. One important note, LED's are sensitive to polarity. One of my turn signal/DRL lights was wired in reverse polarity and I had to correct it. My wife also has a 2015 Genesis and both her lights are wired backwards. Easy fix and not significant if you're using an incandescent bulb, but it's still wrong and must be fixed if you want to use LEDs. I didn't notice this issue when I bought switchback LEDs and assumed that they just didn't work. I ended up returning them and only later saw a thread from another owner who noted the polarity error from Hyundai. Once fixed, everything worked well.
 

AggieAloha

Hasn't posted much yet...
15
2
3
Dallas, TX
I replaced the DRL 1157 bulbs with simple LED's - great change....easy....needed to add resistors to eliminate rapid signal flashing. One important note, LED's are sensitive to polarity. One of my turn signal/DRL lights was wired in reverse polarity and I had to correct it. My wife also has a 2015 Genesis and both her lights are wired backwards. Easy fix and not significant if you're using an incandescent bulb, but it's still wrong and must be fixed if you want to use LEDs. I didn't notice this issue when I bought switchback LEDs and assumed that they just didn't work. I ended up returning them and only later saw a thread from another owner who noted the polarity error from Hyundai. Once fixed, everything worked well.
Thanks for the tip. Did you replace them with single color LED? I noticed they had some dual light LED's (white in DRL mode, amber in turn signal).
 

1FstYota

Registered Member
1,041
114
63
WA
I throw in some LEDs for turn signals just for fun without the resistors, it hyper blinks and once and a while it trips the light control screen flashes on my dash as if it was switching form auto to parking lights. Really weird behavior so I took them out.
 

McGyver9

Hasn't posted much yet...
10
0
1
NY
I'm interested also.. (Day time running light (DRL) /turn signal LED conversion)

I started my own thread on this subject, since all of the links in the older threads are dead....got zero replies.
The 'search' function on the forum doesn't allow you to search for the popular abbreviation: DRL, DRL's...

There are a lot of what they call "1157 switchback" LED lights on the web...and they "claim" they work in EVERYTHING, of course...
(w/out the need for capacitors or resistors, as mentioned in older posts)

Would appreciate a reply from someone w/ a 2nd Gen to let me know what ones actually WORKED..

Thanks in advance!
______________________________
 

diamondmit

Hasn't posted much yet...
17
3
0
Thanks for the tip. Did you replace them with single color LED? I noticed they had some dual light LED's (white in DRL mode, amber in turn signal).
Sorry for the slow response. I tried the switchbacks first (white for DRL, yellow for signals) but this was before I realized that the car had been wired with reverse polarity, so the LED's didn't work at all. I returned them and then read a post about someone else trying the same thing and when I read about the polarity I "knew" that was my issue. Rather than wait, I picked up some LED's at Autozone and swapped the wires - worked great. Lights blinked too rapidly though so I ordered the resistors, bridged the wires and have been running this way for about 2 months. Very happy with the look. Easy job, no challenges.
 

Rick5086

Registered Member
21
0
0
Well I am sitting at the dealer as I write this. My turn signal bulbs have been replaced 3 times in the past 12 months. I have a 15 5.0 and the latest event in this turn signal story is that the last replacement resulted in one bulb being considerably dimmer than the other. Changing the bulb didn’t have any effect, so Hyundai suggested changing the headlight assembly, which is being done now.
This dealer has been great to me, but this is really starting to be a pain.
 

MNgen

Registered Member
41
2
8
Minneapolis
Burned out and dim bulbs all point to a low voltage issue at the bulb socket not the headlamp housing itself. A poor connection, corrosion or a compromised/chewed wire somewhere along the line is possible. Mice took the liberty of storing the fruit from a Russian olive tree inside the hood of my Genesis.
______________________________
 

JohnS

Hasn't posted much yet...
Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.

2017-8-5 12-29-53.jpg
2017-8-5 12-39-28.jpg
2017-8-5 12-32-20.jpg
2017-8-5 12-35-41.jpg

- - - Updated - - -

Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.

2017-8-5 12-29-53.jpg
2017-8-5 12-39-28.jpg
2017-8-5 12-32-20.jpg
2017-8-5 12-35-41.jpg
 

kolme

Getting familiar with the group...
64
5
8
Texas
Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.
Very interesting post, it certainly seems like something went sour regarding these sockets prior to factory rollout. Have you or anyone else confirmed that only 1 filament lights? Does the metal DC+ only contact 1 bulb contact? Thanks for the post JohnS.
 

dubbyak

Hasn't posted much yet...
20
1
3
Raleigh, NC
From my observation on my 2015 Genesis Sedan w/HID headlights, the 2357A DRL/Turn Signal bulbs are being pulsed on-off by the Turn Signal circuit, not a voltage increase-decrease as described earlier. This is why an LED lamp has worked for some. There is still a problem with most LEDs not pulling enough current to keep the car's lamp out circuitry from causing the lamp to hyperflash when the Turn Signal is applied, but some LED replacements out there might draw enough current for this to work normally. Also, we know that some cars came from the factory with the polarity reversed in one or both DRL/Turn Signal sockets. The LEDs are wired such that the "Sleeve" is the bulb is ground, and the base contacts at the bottom of the bulb are the Positive contacts. LEDs won't work if the polarity is reversed.

I am going to experiment with the Sylvania ZEVO 2057A/2357A LED bulb to see if it hyperflashes. The listed electrical wattage for each LED in the dual filament replacement is 1.5W / 0.4 W @ 12.8Volts. I will see if this is enough to let the car's circuitry know that the bulb is not out. I may even bridge the positive contacts on the bulb so both LED segments illuminate at once, which would raise the wattage to 1.9W. That is still less than 150mA of current, but it is worth a try.
 

kolme

Getting familiar with the group...
64
5
8
Texas
From my observation on my 2015 Genesis Sedan w/HID headlights, the 2357A DRL/Turn Signal bulbs are being pulsed on-off by the Turn Signal circuit, not a voltage increase-decrease as described earlier. This is why an LED lamp has worked for some. There is still a problem with most LEDs not pulling enough current to keep the car's lamp out circuitry from causing the lamp to hyperflash when the Turn Signal is applied, but some LED replacements out there might draw enough current for this to work normally. Also, we know that some cars came from the factory with the polarity reversed in one or both DRL/Turn Signal sockets. The LEDs are wired such that the "Sleeve" is the bulb is ground, and the base contacts at the bottom of the bulb are the Positive contacts. LEDs won't work if the polarity is reversed.

I am going to experiment with the Sylvania ZEVO 2057A/2357A LED bulb to see if it hyperflashes. The listed electrical wattage for each LED in the dual filament replacement is 1.5W / 0.4 W @ 12.8Volts. I will see if this is enough to let the car's circuitry know that the bulb is not out. I may even bridge the positive contacts on the bulb so both LED segments illuminate at once, which would raise the wattage to 1.9W. That is still less than 150mA of current, but it is worth a try.
Sounds like we good plan. Let us know what you find!!@
 
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