5.0 fuel economy tips

J Dixon

Registered Member
39
25
18
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Yes, I know keeping my foot out of it would be #1. Got it.

Other than that though, has anyone found differences with oil, air filters, gasoline type, air pressure, tire brand?

My 2015 5.0 Ultimate is a CPO and came with a new set of Continental ProContact XT tires. Cold the tires are 33 pounds and build up to 36 in normal driving. I'll use synthetic oil only, but likely to just have all service done at the dealership.
I'm not complaining about the mileage. It gets around 21mpg combined, and over 28mpg highway in the 75mph range. Still interested in doing anything reasonable to improve the numbers.
 
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J Dixon

Registered Member
39
25
18
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
I'm certainly not complaining. Still, the Z28 in the photo I had for twelve years. I was able to coax 30.4 mpg on a highway trip one time. Just have to find the right combination.Cars (2).jpg
 

Suburbazine

SUPPORTING MEMBER
160
43
28
Louisiana
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
According to Hyundai's service manual, best fuel mileage is achieved with 5w-20 oil. That's honestly too thin for my climate so I'll never go lower than 5w-30. I exclusively run RenewableLube HDMO since it has the lowest consumption rate and best longevity of any oil I've tested. Oil filter choice is Wix WL10067.

Tire pressure, higher is better. You can even go to the max cold rating on the tires but your ride and handling will suffer tremendously...yet your rolling resistance will be at the lowest possible. I've never liked Continental tires as they are loud and wear poorly- and bad wear life means more rolling resistance. I'm partial to Michelin A/S 3+ but I can't say you'll get a measurable efficiency change over another tire. The stock pressure numbers are 33psi front, 35psi rear.

Premium fuel nets about 1MPG increase.

Air filters don't matter much as long as they're clean. You could even do K&N but they won't be any better than the standard filters.

Turn off the A/C compressor. Yes, I know it's variable demand. If you're not dying of heat nor dying from lack of visibility, it's just wasting fuel being enabled. You could theoretically exceed fuel savings of Eco mode, since it only limits A/C performance.

Minimize electrical load. If you have a cigarette lighter voltage meter, seeing it drop to <12v at cruise should bring you joy. The car will dynamically disable the alternator at cruising speed if electrical demand is low. This can net you an unknown increase in mileage, since the load on the alternator can vary wildly under a demand state.
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EdP

Supporting Member
SUPPORTING MEMBER
SUSTAINING MEMBER
3,714
912
113
Parrish, FL
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G80
According to Hyundai's service manual, best fuel mileage is achieved with 5w-20 oil. That's honestly too thin for my climate so I'll never go lower than 5w-30. I exclusively run RenewableLube HDMO since it has the lowest consumption rate and best longevity of any oil I've tested. Oil filter choice is Wix WL10067.

Tire pressure, higher is better. You can even go to the max cold rating on the tires but your ride and handling will suffer tremendously...yet your rolling resistance will be at the lowest possible. I've never liked Continental tires as they are loud and wear poorly- and bad wear life means more rolling resistance. I'm partial to Michelin A/S 3+ but I can't say you'll get a measurable efficiency change over another tire. The stock pressure numbers are 33psi front, 35psi rear.

Premium fuel nets about 1MPG increase.

Air filters don't matter much as long as they're clean. You could even do K&N but they won't be any better than the standard filters.

Turn off the A/C compressor. Yes, I know it's variable demand. If you're not dying of heat nor dying from lack of visibility, it's just wasting fuel being enabled. You could theoretically exceed fuel savings of Eco mode, since it only limits A/C performance.

Minimize electrical load. If you have a cigarette lighter voltage meter, seeing it drop to <12v at cruise should bring you joy. The car will dynamically disable the alternator at cruising speed if electrical demand is low. This can net you an unknown increase in mileage, since the load on the alternator can vary wildly under a demand state.
All those thing work, but , , ,
I bought a luxury car for a luxury driving experience. Before I do things like turn off the AC, I'd buy an Accent and get better mileage. Reducing electrical load means not using the heated/ventilated seats or the rear defroster. I'm not going to increase tire pressure at the risk of handling poorly when needed.
 

J Dixon

Registered Member
39
25
18
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
According to Hyundai's service manual, best fuel mileage is achieved with 5w-20 oil. That's honestly too thin for my climate so I'll never go lower than 5w-30. I exclusively run RenewableLube HDMO since it has the lowest consumption rate and best longevity of any oil I've tested. Oil filter choice is Wix WL10067.

Tire pressure, higher is better. You can even go to the max cold rating on the tires but your ride and handling will suffer tremendously...yet your rolling resistance will be at the lowest possible. I've never liked Continental tires as they are loud and wear poorly- and bad wear life means more rolling resistance. I'm partial to Michelin A/S 3+ but I can't say you'll get a measurable efficiency change over another tire. The stock pressure numbers are 33psi front, 35psi rear.

Premium fuel nets about 1MPG increase.

Air filters don't matter much as long as they're clean. You could even do K&N but they won't be any better than the standard filters.

Turn off the A/C compressor. Yes, I know it's variable demand. If you're not dying of heat nor dying from lack of visibility, it's just wasting fuel being enabled. You could theoretically exceed fuel savings of Eco mode, since it only limits A/C performance.

Minimize electrical load. If you have a cigarette lighter voltage meter, seeing it drop to <12v at cruise should bring you joy. The car will dynamically disable the alternator at cruising speed if electrical demand is low. This can net you an unknown increase in mileage, since the load on the alternator can vary wildly under a demand state.
Thanks for taking the time to post that. Good, common sense, suggestions.
I bumped tire pressure up to 35 on all. So far I am seeing the rears get slightly higher while driving (38), compared to front left 36, front right 37. Still going to tinker with tire pressure but I'm already convinced 33psi cold is too low. I run Shell 93 octane exclusively. The absolute best performance gain with air filters I've ever experienced was with AMSOIL filters (never saw them in a store though). I replaced a K&N with one in a LS1 engine and actually felt a smidgen of improved acceleration and a couple of tenths in mpg. I agree that a clean filter (or two now) is the most important factor.
Going to have all oil changes done at the dealership. A friend of mine works there and I have complete trust in them doing the job right as they have for our Sonata for 5+ years. I only use synthetic oil in all my cars (two have turbos) and I doubt I'll ever go back to dino oil. Wix oil filters have always rated high in my book. I think the NAPA Gold filters are Wix as well.
I have a plug-in meter for voltage. I'm going to check that as well. So far I'm skeptical of any real difference in using ECO over Normal for most of my driving. It seems Normal shift points are better suited to my driving and the rpms at highway speed are the same for both modes. I wonder if the less enthusiastic shifting in ECO might actually waste fuel until you reach highway cruising speeds. Time will tell.
As far as the AC, well, no problem in the current weather but I've seen some people post they get improvement in MPG in warmer environments. Can't say I've ever noticed that with my other cars but the upcoming summer will be my first with a Genesis.

I appreciate the advice.
 

J Dixon

Registered Member
39
25
18
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
All those thing work, but , , ,
I bought a luxury car for a luxury driving experience. Before I do things like turn off the AC, I'd buy an Accent and get better mileage. Reducing electrical load means not using the heated/ventilated seats or the rear defroster. I'm not going to increase tire pressure at the risk of handling poorly when needed.
I see your points. I'm not too concerned about limiting AC use either, but I do feel the modest increase in tire pressure will improve handling characteristics rather than hinder them. Having trained in pursuit driving on closed courses we ALWAYS had to ensure a minimum of 40psi in our cars (we all had take-home cars) for high speed. On big, fully loaded, patrol cars the extra pressure was definitely a plus. It also served well for when curbs, etc., had to be negotiated. Lower tire pressure at impact would break the seal bead, the tire went flat instantly, and your pursuit was over. Higher tire pressure and proper technique minimized it.

Thanks for the input.
 
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