dead battery multiple times

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rock

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have a genesis 09 and have dead battery 4 times . Each time it is if I leave the car unused ( not driven) for more than 3 days. I have recently replaced the battery at the service dept at the local dealer as they said it was a bad battery. Well I just had another dead car after not driving it for 3 days. it has been sitting in a garage at 62 degrees. I am wondring if any other owners have faced a similar problem? I can not take this car to the airport because of this issue.
 

DJaxx

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Ontario
have a genesis 09 and have dead battery 4 times . Each time it is if I leave the car unused ( not driven) for more than 3 days. I have recently replaced the battery at the service dept at the local dealer as they said it was a bad battery. Well I just had another dead car after not driving it for 3 days. it has been sitting in a garage at 62 degrees. I am wondring if any other owners have faced a similar problem? I can not take this car to the airport because of this issue.
Rock......check out the following thread. Several have experienced your problem and found this to be the "genesis" of the problem........Pun intended. :D

http://genesisowners.com/hyundai-genesis-forum/showthread.php?t=5076
 

cschuler

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The way to fix this kind of problem is to first determine if there is a phantom load or a sneak path or some other situation where the battery is being drained while the car is turned off and just sitting around.

First, one must know what the normal quiescent current drain is (Hyundai does know). There is always some fixed drain due to the security system and other electronic systems. It is usually low ... in the milliampere range.

Second, one must measure the actual quiescent current drain by disconnecting one of the battery terminals and inserting a series ammeter. If the current is high, then one must isolate the phantom load by systematically pulling and reinserting fuses.

It can be a time-consuming process and should be performed by a mechanic or technician with the proper skill set. Always check the service bulletins first!
 

dond13

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Round Rock, Tx
Rubber knob on the hood was my issue.
I posted in another thread about this two years ago when it happened to me. The first time was within two weeks after I bought the car and had to have it towed in. They replace my battery and two weeks later, it happend again. This time I had a charger and was able to charge the battery so I drove it in. They kept it for 3 days and finally found the piece missing. It has been fine ever since.
 

Cut-Throat

Registered Member
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Minneapolis
Rubber knob on the hood was my issue.
I just looked at my Genesis and found the switch and rubber knob that engages it. What I am trying to figure out, is what purpose this switch serves?

The only thing I can think of is keeping the power engaged for some maint procedures for service technicians. I can not think of a reason for a consumer.
 

dond13

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Round Rock, Tx
I just looked at my Genesis and found the switch and rubber knob that engages it. What I am trying to figure out, is what purpose this switch serves?

The only thing I can think of is keeping the power engaged for some maint procedures for service technicians. I can not think of a reason for a consumer.
I was told that it is connected to the theft alarm system. I don't know it this is right, but it might make sense except that my theft alarm never went off.
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Cut-Throat

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I was told that it is connected to the theft alarm system. I don't know it this is right, but it might make sense except that my theft alarm never went off.
Yup, I don't buy this explanation. Otherwise, all of the folks that had their rubber knobs missing would have had their alarms going off. Not to mention the dealerships would have found the problem a lot sooner.
 

mikec

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Many car alarms detect trunk or hood opening as "break in attempts" - ONCE those are closed. You wouldn't want the alarm to trigger when you closed the trunk right after parking the car, right? (park car, open door & trunk, get out, close door, lock it, get your briefcase out of the trunk, close trunk. Ideally the alarm is "armed" now, not sounding!) Hyundai's manuals call this the "ARM HOLD" state: the alarm is ready to ARM but won't ARM until all doors, the trunk, and the hood are actually closed.

A lot of the Genesis electronics stuff "wakes up" whenever it thinks the driver is nearby. Note how long the "Genesis" splash screen displays on the nav display for the following scenarios:
#1 car is parked but not locked (in your garage I hope!). So the first time the car gets a hint you're nearby is when you actually grab the door handle and open the door. Or if you open the trunk.

#2: car is parked and locked. You use the key fob to remotely unlock the car (or to remotely pop the trunk) while you're still walking to the car. It'll start it's "wake up" stuff at this point; you may notice the nav system is ready much sooner than scenario #1.

#3: car is parked & locked. You unlock it by the key or by pressing the door handle button instead of using the key fob remote, or you use the key to open the trunk. Again, the car doesn't know you're nearby until you actually unlock it.

Having any door open, the hood, or the trunk open is interpreted as "driver is nearby" to the system so OFF stuff may power up to the "standby" level instead. Standby = ready to turn ON quickly if you return to the car quickly after shutting the car off (e.g. running into 7-11 or Starbucks for a moment). The battery apparently can support this "standby" mode for a day or two based on other threads. After the car really has been parked a while the electronics shut down fully - just the alarm, clock, and various memories are powered The battery can support this for a few weeks at least. Cars missing the hood switch rubber piece likely never leave the "standby" mode because the alarm sees "hood/trunk is open... driver must be doing something... I'll wait for the hood/trunk to close before I fully power down and really ARM the alarm."

The hood switch is described in chapter 13, the "Body Electrical System" section, of the factory service manuals. It's listed in the section describing how the factory alarm system operates.

mike c.
 
Last edited:

homeofstone

Registered Member
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Athens, Georgia, USA
Many car alarms detect trunk or hood opening as "break in attempts" - ONCE those are closed. You wouldn't want the alarm to trigger when you closed the trunk right after parking the car, right? (park car, open door & trunk, get out, close door, lock it, get your briefcase out of the trunk, close trunk. Ideally the alarm is "armed" now, not sounding!) Hyundai's manuals call this the "ARM HOLD" state: the alarm is ready to ARM but won't ARM until all doors, the trunk, and the hood are actually closed.

A lot of the Genesis electronics stuff "wakes up" whenever it thinks the driver is nearby. Note how long the "Genesis" splash screen displays on the nav display for the following scenarios:
#1 car is parked but not locked (in your garage I hope!). So the first time the car gets a hint you're nearby is when you actually grab the door handle and open the door. Or if you open the trunk.

#2: car is parked and locked. You use the key fob to remotely unlock the car (or to remotely pop the trunk) while you're still walking to the car. It'll start it's "wake up" stuff at this point; you may notice the nav system is ready much sooner than scenario #1.

#3: car is parked & locked. You unlock it by the key or by pressing the door handle button instead of using the key fob remote, or you use the key to open the trunk. Again, the car doesn't know you're nearby until you actually unlock it.

Having any door open, the hood, or the trunk open is interpreted as "driver is nearby" to the system so OFF stuff may power up to the "standby" level instead. Standby = ready to turn ON quickly if you return to the car quickly after shutting the car off (e.g. running into 7-11 or Starbucks for a moment). The battery apparently can support this "standby" mode for a day or two based on other threads. After the car really has been parked a while the electronics shut down fully - just the alarm, clock, and various memories are powered The battery can support this for a few weeks at least. Cars missing the hood switch rubber piece likely never leave the "standby" mode because the alarm sees "hood/trunk is open... driver must be doing something... I'll wait for the hood/trunk to close before I fully power down and really ARM the alarm."

The hood switch is described in chapter 13, the "Body Electrical System" section, of the factory service manuals. It's listed in the section describing how the factory alarm system operates.

mike c.
thanks Mikec, I had the dead battery problem a few weeks ago. I read about the rubber piece in another thread then and also reviewed my manual again. I did have the rubber piece but it was not pushing the switch down far enough. Hyundai has a TSB on this with a larger rubber bumper. I had one a little larger in my shop that fit so mine is ok now. Anyway my point is that the orginal bumper may not be thick enough on some cars and therefore a TSB was issued by Hyundai.
 

dond13

Been here awhile...
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Round Rock, Tx
Many car alarms detect trunk or hood opening as "break in attempts" - ONCE those are closed. You wouldn't want the alarm to trigger when you closed the trunk right after parking the car, right? (park car, open door & trunk, get out, close door, lock it, get your briefcase out of the trunk, close trunk. Ideally the alarm is "armed" now, not sounding!) Hyundai's manuals call this the "ARM HOLD" state: the alarm is ready to ARM but won't ARM until all doors, the trunk, and the hood are actually closed.

A lot of the Genesis electronics stuff "wakes up" whenever it thinks the driver is nearby. Note how long the "Genesis" splash screen displays on the nav display for the following scenarios:
#1 car is parked but not locked (in your garage I hope!). So the first time the car gets a hint you're nearby is when you actually grab the door handle and open the door. Or if you open the trunk.

#2: car is parked and locked. You use the key fob to remotely unlock the car (or to remotely pop the trunk) while you're still walking to the car. It'll start it's "wake up" stuff at this point; you may notice the nav system is ready much sooner than scenario #1.

#3: car is parked & locked. You unlock it by the key or by pressing the door handle button instead of using the key fob remote, or you use the key to open the trunk. Again, the car doesn't know you're nearby until you actually unlock it.

Having any door open, the hood, or the trunk open is interpreted as "driver is nearby" to the system so OFF stuff may power up to the "standby" level instead. Standby = ready to turn ON quickly if you return to the car quickly after shutting the car off (e.g. running into 7-11 or Starbucks for a moment). The battery apparently can support this "standby" mode for a day or two based on other threads. After the car really has been parked a while the electronics shut down fully - just the alarm, clock, and various memories are powered The battery can support this for a few weeks at least. Cars missing the hood switch rubber piece likely never leave the "standby" mode because the alarm sees "hood/trunk is open... driver must be doing something... I'll wait for the hood/trunk to close before I fully power down and really ARM the alarm."

The hood switch is described in chapter 13, the "Body Electrical System" section, of the factory service manuals. It's listed in the section describing how the factory alarm system operates.

mike c.
Very good explanation. I wasn't sure the tech guy was right till now. Thanks
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Cut-Throat

Registered Member
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Minneapolis
The alarm system explanation makes sense. A very complicated system indeed! Especially when you consider that if you hear a car alarm going off, the last thing you think of is "Someone is trying to steal the car":D The thing that most often comes to mind is the owner has sat on his key fob and pushed the panic button.:D
 

Silver Bullet 00

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Hi Genesis owners, I'm a AZERA owner and I enjoy your forums. Read about your battery drains but I haven't read of anyone checking into TSB 09-BE-019 B1602&1603 Battery Drain Condition. This sounds like the problems some of you are having. I see where someone mentioned TSB 09-BE-026 Hood Switch Pad replacement, we have the same problem with the Azera whenever the rubber pad falls off. I'm sure your are all aware of all the TSB's on Hyundai cars listed on the Hyundai Service Website. :)
 
Thread starter #15

rock

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yes thanks one and all.the rubber thing was gone and this was the issue. Wouldn't you think Hyundaii would issue a letter to the dealerships with this issue being so prevalent!!!
 

homeofstone

Registered Member
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38
Athens, Georgia, USA
yes thanks one and all.the rubber thing was gone and this was the issue. Wouldn't you think Hyundaii would issue a letter to the dealerships with this issue being so prevalent!!!
Hyundai has issued a TSB and has a replacement "rubber bumper" that is just a bit thicker due to some OE bumpers developing a divit and not pressing down the switch far enough. Also for lost rubber bumpers.
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Gunkk

Registered Member
1,274
26
48
Florida
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Just got back from a 4 day trip to find the battery completely dead at the airport. Got a jump and checked the forum when I got home. Lo and behold no bumper for the switch on my car. Quick trip to the dealer this morning got it replaced under warranty and a comp car wash too!

Here's what it looks like when properly installed:

 

drkjdr

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My 2010 Genesis went dead the first two times I went out of town for a week. The car was in the garage. Now I turn off the automatic headlight control and the rain sensing wipers while I travel ......as a result I can travel for a month and no problem on return.

It is the same for my friend's Azera.
 

Hutch

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Pennsylvania
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I called my dealer and the parts guy said he had the bumper, but it wouldn't prevent drawing down the battery...I hope you guys are right!

Surprisingly, he didn't charge me for the bumper.
 
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