Electrified GV70 EV to debut Nov. 19

Chad86tsi

Registered Member
365
191
43
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Probably coal powered vehicles if I had to guess
Naw, they will just invent nighttime solar. Build the cars and the power industry will adapt... Carrot and stick.

I work in the power industry for one of the largest utilities. I work with and support the guys that figure out how to generate and distribute the power over a very large (multi-state) region, so I know where power actually comes from, and how it actually gets there.

The rate at which we are trying to electrify the countries automotive fleet is far greater than the rate that local utilities can grow generation and evolve appropriate distribution systems. It can and will happen, but they are not in sync. You can't fight the laws of physics on this one.

Many places are already dealing with imbalances of supply/demand, and this is going to hurt that imbalance. Given that most charge their EV's at night means most EV's are charged with a very large % of carbon based electricity (in some regions it's entirely carbon based at night). If we grow the EV fleet too quickly, this will get much worse before it gets better.

Things to think about....
 

Chad86tsi

Registered Member
365
191
43
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Generally EV's sell less because of limited battery supply, not lack of demand. You see the same problem even on PHEV's like the RAV4 Prime, which have ridiculous demand but tiny supply, leading to crazy markups (even prior to COVID). The only manufacturer to avoid this problem is Tesla because they have their own battery factory.

I think Genesis will sell every GV70 they make, unsavory dealer markups included. The only question is how many they're capable of making now that Hyundai/Kia have so many other EV's in the pipeline and not a huge supply of batteries to fit them all.
Audi and Jag EV's were being discounted $15,000 to $20,000, and even $25,000 off MSRP just 2 years ago because they were not selling. I almost jumped on one because of that, but the discount also killed the resale value, so if I wasn't happy with it, I'd be stuck with a car no one wanted to buy off me.

Chevy had to discount it's Volt by the same ratio, same problem : people won't buy them as fast as we think they will.

I'm glad they are building them, and there will be buyers, but I'd be surprised if they sell well compared to the gas powertrains.
 

blue92lx

Registered Member
92
58
18
Genesis Model Year
2022
Genesis Model Type
Genesis GV70
Naw, they will just invent nighttime solar. Build the cars and the power industry will adapt... Carrot and stick.

I work in the power industry for one of the largest utilities. I work with and support the guys that figure out how to generate and distribute the power over a very large (multi-state) region, so I know where power actually comes from, and how it actually gets there.

The rate at which we are trying to electrify the countries automotive fleet is far greater than the rate that local utilities can grow generation and evolve appropriate distribution systems. It can and will happen, but they are not in sync. You can't fight the laws of physics on this one.

Many places are already dealing with imbalances of supply/demand, and this is going to hurt that imbalance. Given that most charge their EV's at night means most EV's are charged with a very large % of carbon based electricity (in some regions it's entirely carbon based at night). If we grow the EV fleet too quickly, this will get much worse before it gets better.

Things to think about....
Actually my reply was sarcastic towards the what they were trying to ask. But yes things will need to change, or we meet in the middle and do something like 50/50 electric and gas, etc. Humans will figure it out, we have somewhat smart people that are out there. It's not like the world is going to go EV in 2030 and be like, here's your EV sorry you can't charge it or turn on your refrigerator!
 

Chad86tsi

Registered Member
365
191
43
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Actually my reply was sarcastic towards the what they were trying to ask. But yes things will need to change, or we meet in the middle and do something like 50/50 electric and gas, etc. Humans will figure it out, we have somewhat smart people that are out there. It's not like the world is going to go EV in 2030 and be like, here's your EV sorry you can't charge it or turn on your refrigerator!

I want to believe that, but multiple auto manufactures are committed to being 100% EV before then, several much sooner. The great ideas and plans seem to be well ahead of reality/possibility. If they "make it happen anyway", there will be a lot of pain.
______________________________
 

bill davis

Registered Member
124
14
18
Genesis Model Year
2022
Genesis Model Type
Genesis GV70
Part of the issue is that the charging infrastructure of course isn't anywhere near what gas is, simply because EV's haven't been a viable solution until recently with Tesla pushing it forward. Car manufacturers and also companies like Electrify America are working together to start bringing in more infrastructure.

Having a realistic view is important here. Even hypothetically if every manufacturer in the world was only producing EV's by 2030, there are still going to be primarily gas vehicles being driven. People have this weird image that all of a sudden all gas vehicles are going to suddenly vanish from the Earth, that's not the case.

As far as why want one? I had a Mach E GT on preorder until I found the GV70. If you haven't driven an EV I'd recommend test driving one. Instant torque all the time starting at 0 mph, completely silent, the smoothest acceleration you'll ever feel, you can floor it over and over again and not feel like you're going to damage something in the drivetrain.

For me long distance isn't a huge deal, I doing trips maybe 3-4 times a year where I'd need to do quick charging. This is where the Ford was slower, but a lot of manufacturers can recharge to 80% in about 15-20 minutes which really isn't that bad. Ford was about 35-40 minutes. And of course that's from almost 0% charge to 80%, which isn't the case most of the time.

EV's are going to take a LOT of education for people. You don't fill it up, you use apps to plan your charging stops on long trips so you know for instance ok this one I should be stopping with about 20% left in the battery, I only need to charge to 60%, so that's maybe 10 minutes. It's not like gas where you just stop and fill it to 100%.

As far as first responders I'd assume they're already trained to look for the signs of an EV and pull the emergency shut down on the battery to disconnect it. I don't think you can really argue about fires, etc. Any huge accident is a potential danger for fire with gas or batteries. Even hybrids that have been around for a LONG time now have the same batteries EV's do, EV's just have more batteries than hybrids. So this isn't something new. There are also a LOT of safety precautions taken to protect batteries from major accidents, the same as a gas tank that could explode while the responders are onsite.

The main thing to consider is that this isn't a new thing. Not in the slightest. This isn't like suddenly we're just jamming batteries into a car and hoping for the best. There are, and have been for decades now, safety testing, safety regulations, and everything in between to keep the batteries safe from harm.

For disposal, they can refurbish a battery just like anything else. The battery trays are actually a bunch of smaller batteries essentially tied together. Just because your "battery dies" does not mean they throw out the entire battery tray. They'll take it out, test each individual cell and replace the bad cell. Disposal isn't as extreme as people make it out to be and you can bet there will be reusing and recycling batteries just like junk yards are full of cars right now being recycled and reused.

Full EV's for sure are a new thing for the masses, but in reality it's decades old. That's the main thing to keep in mind. And Hybrids which are basically EV's with smaller batteries have been around decades longer than EV's have.
most car companies are going to stop making gas cars by 2030 ,,,genesis said no gas cars after 2025 ,,,,,gas cars will be around used for a long time ,,,but biden is pushing gas prices up so high to force people to go electric,,,,,then electric rates will sky rocket
 

Backslack

Registered Member
1,233
702
113
Audi and Jag EV's were being discounted $15,000 to $20,000, and even $25,000 off MSRP just 2 years ago because they were not selling. I almost jumped on one because of that, but the discount also killed the resale value, so if I wasn't happy with it, I'd be stuck with a car no one wanted to buy off me.
Maybe they did, but they also had to cut back production due to battery supply issues.

 

jetrep

Registered Member
96
91
18
Southern NV
Genesis Model Year
2019
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Pass. Is anybody asking where the electricity will come from? Nope. USA nation of sheep
A good bit of stupidity to unpack here. EV take rate is pretty low in the US. Other nations such as Norway are buying into EVs in a much bigger way.

Plenty of people ask where the electrical energy comes from. Last I checked EVs after factoring electricity sources are still quite a bit more efficient than ICE vehicles. I don't have a dog in this fight but to imply that folks that buy EVs are sheep is quite naive.
 

Chad86tsi

Registered Member
365
191
43
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Maybe they did, but they also had to cut back production due to battery supply issues.

All the more reason to be concerned we are on a path that will be unstainable on multiple levels. At least gas isn't has hard to get/produce from many diverse sources. While it has price fluctuations, you can still fill your gas car, and they can still build it's powertrain with little issue. When battery supplies are far more difficult to sustain in volume, and charging them becomes problematic, we may dream for the gas lines of the oil crisis days.
______________________________
 

dklanecky

Registered Member
47
25
18
Genesis Model Year
2022
Genesis Model Type
No Genesis Yet!
A good bit of stupidity to unpack here. EV take rate is pretty low in the US. Other nations such as Norway are buying into EVs in a much bigger way.

Plenty of people ask where the electrical energy comes from. Last I checked EVs after factoring electricity sources are still quite a bit more efficient than ICE vehicles. I don't have a dog in this fight but to imply that folks that buy EVs are sheep is quite naive.
Strange comparison, given that Norway has ~58,000 miles of roads to drive on, and the USA has ~4,000,000 miles of roads to drive on.
 

Chad86tsi

Registered Member
365
191
43
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Strange comparison, given that Norway has ~58,000 miles of roads to drive on, and the USA has ~4,000,000 miles of roads to drive on.


according to Google:

The average annual miles driven in the United States is about 14,263. In Norway 7,636 miles per year.
 

dklanecky

Registered Member
47
25
18
Genesis Model Year
2022
Genesis Model Type
No Genesis Yet!
according to Google:

The average annual miles driven in the United States is about 14,263. In Norway 7,636 miles per year.
So we drive our vehicles on average twice as much per day/month/year as they do in Norway?
 

TBickell

Registered Member
771
378
63
Genesis Model Type
Genesis GV70
The population of Norway is slightly over 5 million people. Maybe half of those drive. The county geographically is tiny. Looking at what are doing compared to 360 million in the US is just silly.
 

TBickell

Registered Member
771
378
63
Genesis Model Type
Genesis GV70
Part of the issue is that the charging infrastructure of course isn't anywhere near what gas is, simply because EV's haven't been a viable solution until recently with Tesla pushing it forward. Car manufacturers and also companies like Electrify America are working together to start bringing in more infrastructure.

Having a realistic view is important here. Even hypothetically if every manufacturer in the world was only producing EV's by 2030, there are still going to be primarily gas vehicles being driven. People have this weird image that all of a sudden all gas vehicles are going to suddenly vanish from the Earth, that's not the case.

As far as why want one? I had a Mach E GT on preorder until I found the GV70. If you haven't driven an EV I'd recommend test driving one. Instant torque all the time starting at 0 mph, completely silent, the smoothest acceleration you'll ever feel, you can floor it over and over again and not feel like you're going to damage something in the drivetrain.

For me long distance isn't a huge deal, I doing trips maybe 3-4 times a year where I'd need to do quick charging. This is where the Ford was slower, but a lot of manufacturers can recharge to 80% in about 15-20 minutes which really isn't that bad. Ford was about 35-40 minutes. And of course that's from almost 0% charge to 80%, which isn't the case most of the time.

EV's are going to take a LOT of education for people. You don't fill it up, you use apps to plan your charging stops on long trips so you know for instance ok this one I should be stopping with about 20% left in the battery, I only need to charge to 60%, so that's maybe 10 minutes. It's not like gas where you just stop and fill it to 100%.

As far as first responders I'd assume they're already trained to look for the signs of an EV and pull the emergency shut down on the battery to disconnect it. I don't think you can really argue about fires, etc. Any huge accident is a potential danger for fire with gas or batteries. Even hybrids that have been around for a LONG time now have the same batteries EV's do, EV's just have more batteries than hybrids. So this isn't something new. There are also a LOT of safety precautions taken to protect batteries from major accidents, the same as a gas tank that could explode while the responders are onsite.

The main thing to consider is that this isn't a new thing. Not in the slightest. This isn't like suddenly we're just jamming batteries into a car and hoping for the best. There are, and have been for decades now, safety testing, safety regulations, and everything in between to keep the batteries safe from harm.

For disposal, they can refurbish a battery just like anything else. The battery trays are actually a bunch of smaller batteries essentially tied together. Just because your "battery dies" does not mean they throw out the entire battery tray. They'll take it out, test each individual cell and replace the bad cell. Disposal isn't as extreme as people make it out to be and you can bet there will be reusing and recycling batteries just like junk yards are full of cars right now being recycled and reused.

Full EV's for sure are a new thing for the masses, but in reality it's decades old. That's the main thing to keep in mind. And Hybrids which are basically EV's with smaller batteries have been around decades longer than EV's have.
Thanks for reminding me why I have no desire to ever own an EV vehicle besides a golf cart.
 

Duality

Registered Member
39
24
8
Genesis Model Year
2022
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
We need an after market version of its rear license plate/rear bumper for our ice machines
______________________________
 

blue92lx

Registered Member
92
58
18
Genesis Model Year
2022
Genesis Model Type
Genesis GV70
So happy they're keeping the design, should be quick too with 470hp. I wonder if they'll have a sport appearance package available too.
 

TBickell

Registered Member
771
378
63
Genesis Model Type
Genesis GV70
Maybe they can pump some fake ICE exhaust notes into these electric vehicles so we can feel like we are not driving a golf cart.. LOLOLOLOLOLOL
 
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