Fuel Tank Air Filter / Fuel Filter

crhbobby

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Indiana
Hi everyone...

I pulled the recommended maintenance schedule from Hyundai USAs website.

It says at 30K to have change the fuel tank air filter and at 37500 to change the fuel filter. For the V6...

Has anyone changed these themselves? I don't think I have seen much discussion anyone changing these..

Bob Hall
 

crhbobby

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Indiana
Okay...well forget about the fuel tank air filter... What about the fuel filter - anyone?

It looks like it is in the tank and the rear seat needs to come out.


I did some searching about the fuel tank air filter... Looks like this is a Hyundai/Kia thing. I have a friend of mine that works for a company that engineers and makes the fuel systems for hyundai and kia.... He believed that they were good for the life of the car. I have seen on other forums where dealers told them that they were not "replaceable". I am taking my car in for service tomorrow so I will ask them.

Bob
 

Cut-Throat

Registered Member
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Minneapolis
Okay...well forget about the fuel tank air filter... What about the fuel filter - anyone?

It looks like it is in the tank and the rear seat needs to come out.


I did some searching about the fuel tank air filter... Looks like this is a Hyundai/Kia thing. I have a friend of mine that works for a company that engineers and makes the fuel systems for hyundai and kia.... He believed that they were good for the life of the car. I have seen on other forums where dealers told them that they were not "replaceable". I am taking my car in for service tomorrow so I will ask them.

Bob
Please post and let us know about this. I have not heard of it.
 

wallymn

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MN
I discussed this with my dealer,,, They inspected the fuel tank air filter. and found no issues. so did not replace......

The fuel filter they also suggested I skip...

so either have been done... just over 50k now.
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mikec

Registered Member
591
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18
SoCal
Fuel pump + fuel filter are one assembly inside the fuel tank - attached to the top of the tank. Remove the rear seat cushion and you'll see a squarish access plate on the body floor - undo the screws/bolts and remove it. Then you'll see the top of the fuel tank and an oval access plate; that's the main pump, assist pump, pressure regulator, fuel filter, and fuel level sensor. This assembly basically lifts straight up (after hoses are de-pressurized and disconnected); until the assembly is nearly out: that's when fuel level sensor float gets in the way - it sticks out sideways so tilt the assembly and carefully guide it out.

Just aft of the fuel tank is the charcoal canister assembly. This is the key part of the "evaporative emissions control system." Basically this system is a charcoal filled tank that absorbs gas fumes as they evaporate from the fuel tank and fuel hoses/pipes - think "Odor Eaters" for the gas tank. When the engine is warmed up and running, the engine computer trips a solenoid to have engine intake manifold vacuum suck on the canister to draw the trapped fumes out, cleaning the charcoal. The small fuel tank air filter lets fresh air into the canister. If you lift the trunk floor/carpet, you'll see a big rectangular cover plate attached to the floor... removing this allows access to the canister and filter.

mike c.
 

Gwaneum

Getting familiar with the group...
Fuel pump + fuel filter are one assembly inside the fuel tank - attached to the top of the tank. Remove the rear seat cushion and you'll see a squarish access plate on the body floor - undo the screws/bolts and remove it. Then you'll see the top of the fuel tank and an oval access plate; that's the main pump, assist pump, pressure regulator, fuel filter, and fuel level sensor. This assembly basically lifts straight up (after hoses are de-pressurized and disconnected); until the assembly is nearly out: that's when fuel level sensor float gets in the way - it sticks out sideways so tilt the assembly and carefully guide it out.

Just aft of the fuel tank is the charcoal canister assembly. This is the key part of the "evaporative emissions control system." Basically this system is a charcoal filled tank that absorbs gas fumes as they evaporate from the fuel tank and fuel hoses/pipes - think "Odor Eaters" for the gas tank. When the engine is warmed up and running, the engine computer trips a solenoid to have engine intake manifold vacuum suck on the canister to draw the trapped fumes out, cleaning the charcoal. The small fuel tank air filter lets fresh air into the canister. If you lift the trunk floor/carpet, you'll see a big rectangular cover plate attached to the floor... removing this allows access to the canister and filter.

mike c.
Thank you for the write-up.

My Genesis is nearing 36K miles and I have done the fuel tank air filter change at 30K. A bit of contortion required but not horribly difficult. The filter is about $20 or so over the parts counter.

Thanks for the overview of how the fuel pump assembly looks. I do need to get the fuel filter replaced pretty soon, so I'll keep that in mind.
 

crhbobby

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Indiana
Hi everyone

I wanted to comment on my thread I started a while back. I finally asked my dealer about the fuel filter replacement. I am at 40K now.

They told me that they do not consider the fuel filter serviceable since they have to get to it from the inside the tank. He said he would only replace it if perhaps the fuel pump went out, etc.

They must not like changing them... You'd think a dealer would jump all over the maintenance items suggested by the manufacturer.

Our manuals say to do the fuel filter every 37,500, and the fuel air filter every 30K. I didn't even ask about the fuel system air filter.

I suppose I will just be getting an oil change tomorrow.
 

JimInNashville

Registered Member
74
1
6
One of the two dealers I go to recently had the car in for a 24 month service yesterday.

My 2010 Genesis 3.8 has only 11,300 miles on it. I asked him about the fuel tank air filter and he said that in general they do not replace them, and ditto the fuel filter.

I am growing increasingly concerned about the disconnect between Hyundai dealers and Hyundai's own service manual. My service writer said that you could drive the car 50,000 miles and that air filter would still be clean. He quoted me a price of over $200 to replace it.

One has to be careful. Will Hyundai void your warranty if you have a major engine failure, EVEN IF this item had nothing to do with it?

It might be (I am not saying it necessarily is) that this flat rate item has a low profit or even a loss to dealers, and so they are more interested in pursuing high volume high profit oil changes than they are fuel filter replacements.

An alternative interpretation is that the service writer knows these items are hugely over-engineered yet difficult to replace, and is trying to save the customer money.

Which brings me, once again, to a fundamental question. WHY, given the fact that this is a premier forum in North America for Hyundai Genesis owners, isn't Hyundai actively monitoring this forum and providing some guidance to us??
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mcginnpm

Registered Member
I discussed this with my dealer,,, They inspected the fuel tank air filter. and found no issues. so did not replace......

The fuel filter they also suggested I skip...

so either have been done... just over 50k now.
I'd find a new dealer if I were you, especially if they are telling you to skip manufacturer required service intervals.

As for "inspecting" the fuel tank air filter, I'd love to know how they did that. It's a sealed unit with a port about the size of a dime that you can kind of peer inside and see about 10% of one side of the filter (you can just see the folded pleats of the filter in the attached picture). The labor alone involved to remove and "inspect" the filter (#7 in the attached schematic) would justify replacing it, assuming they actually removed and "inspected" it. May as well put a new one in if they went that far.

Cut-Throat is correct in his post above...easy to replace. My filter (pictured here) cost $28.69 at my local Hyundai dealer.
 

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crhbobby

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I see my thread is still going..

This week...I had my car at the Hyundai dealer for an oil change. I now have 56K on the odometer. I asked the service manager about the fuel filter and fuel air filter again. I asked him if their position had changed. He said No...and that if either of those two were an issue the only problem would be a check engine light indicating a clog.

It certainly amazes me though...I am so used to dealers trying to make me do unnecessary things...I have never experienced them the other way around.

Bob
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Mark_888

Registered Member
13,335
137
63
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I see my thread is still going..

This week...I had my car at the Hyundai dealer for an oil change. I now have 56K on the odometer. I asked the service manager about the fuel filter and fuel air filter again. I asked him if their position had changed. He said No...and that if either of those two were an issue the only problem would be a check engine light indicating a clog.

It certainly amazes me though...I am so used to dealers trying to make me do unnecessary things...I have never experienced them the other way around.

Bob
I don't think the dealers have mechanics with enough expertise to do this, and if they make a mistake with the fuel system it could lead to disaster and lawsuits. I am not surprised they don't recommend it, and I agree that a sensor would likely come on if there was a problem.
 

Mark_888

Registered Member
13,335
137
63
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Will Hyundai void your warranty if you have a major engine failure, EVEN IF this item had nothing to do with it?
According to the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) which issues regulations regarding warranties, your dealer cannot deny a warranty claim unless the service item omitted is related to the warranty problem.

That is not to say that some dealers won't try deny a warranty claim for an unrelated skipped service issue, but just remember to mention the FTC, Federal Anti-Trust Laws (triple damages), the local District Attorney, and the local consumer affairs TV reporter, and then suddenly the dealer may re-think his BS attempt to deny the warranty.
 

mcginnpm

Registered Member
Hi everyone...

I pulled the recommended maintenance schedule from Hyundai USAs website.

It says at 30K to have change the fuel tank air filter and at 37500 to change the fuel filter. For the V6...

Has anyone changed these themselves? I don't think I have seen much discussion anyone changing these..

Bob Hall

I finally got around to replacing my fuel tank AIR filter today. It's a bit of a PITA, but not too bad if you don't mind hanging over the trunk sill while you're working. If you want to be more comfortable, you can pull the rear seat back out.

Step 1 - Remove the carpet from the trunk. You'll see a styrofoam pad. Remove the two plastic nuts (they were just hand tight on my car) and remove the pad (see photo 1)

Step 2 - You'll see a retangular access panel. Remove the ten 10mm bolts and remove the panel (see photo 2)

Step 3 - Disconnect the electrical connection from the solonoid valve, disconnect the hose from the charcoal canister, and remove the 10mm retaining bolt (see photo 3)

Step 4 - Disconnect the hose from the fuel tank air filter. Note: it's possible, but not easy, to disconnect it from inside the trunk. Its easier if you do it from under the car. Look for the hose and the filter just above the differential (see photo 4). You could do this before Step 3 above, but it was Step 4 for me when I realized what a pain it was to try and disconnect the hose while I was in the trunk.

Step 5 - Remove the fuel tank air filter. Note: you'll need to wriggle it around a bit to get the valve and hose clear (photo 5 shows how things look with the filter out. You can see the hose that was disconnected from under the car. It doesn't pull up into the trunk area very far. If you've got small hands, you can probably work it from inside the trunk to get it disconnected. Otherwise, just jack up the car, put it on stands, and crawl underneath. It's a LOT easier.)

Step 6 - Remove the two 10mm bolts that mount the solonoid valve and hose to the fuel tank air filter (see photo 6)

Step 7 - Remove the rubber grommet and metal sleeve from the fuel tank air filter (see photo 7)

Installation is the reverse of the above steps.

I don't know why they call for a fuel tank air filter change at 30K? Photo 8 shows the old and new filters side-by-side. I'll let you guess which one is which. The old filter looked brand spanking new to me. Overall it took about an hour to do the job. Now that I know what I'm doing, I could probably do it in 25-30 minutes.

Hope this helps folks :)
 

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zman2012

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Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Thank you for the great write-up. I am planning to replace my fuel tank air filter soon in my 2009 Genesis and this will be very helpful. Thanks again.
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tshile

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mcginnpm's - Thank you very much for the detailed instructions, they will help me greatly when replacing my fuel air filter.

I am having a little issue finding the part number. I used the one posted by someone else here, but I believe it's for a 2011 4.6 and I have a 2012 3.8, and I'm not entirely sure it is the same part.

I'm ordering my parts through PartsWebsite (I get my wife's Honda parts through it and used to get my Tiburon parts through, had good experiences, though I'm open to other suggestions especially if the part lookup is better) and I can't find it. Their exploded diagrams use different numbers than hyundaitechinfo.com.

Is there anyone here that has the part number or has a way of looking it up that they can share? I'm hitting 30k soon.

On a side note the Hyundai dealer's 30k 'recommended' service included changing out the PCV but I don't see anything about that in the service schedule in the book. Does anyone have any feedback on that? I'll keep digging in the mean time

Thanks!
 

gameday22

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730
2
0
Florida
My dealership also told me that it did not need to be replaced and suggested for me to skip the service. I had them put it in writing that the service wasn't needed, which they willingly did so if something does go wrong it's on them. When it comes time for it to be done again if they say the same I'll make sure once again it's noted. Seems to me this isn't a part they like to mess with and are willing to take the risk.
 

tshile

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I talked to the parts department and they gave me the part number. For the 2012 3.8 genesis the fuel tank air filter part number is 314533M100, which is the same part number in the picture mcginnpm posted.
 
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