Larger Throttle Body - another mod

Rey

Registered Member
643
3
18
Salem, OR
The OEM throttle body bore measures about 80 mm. (my recall) on the 4.6 and 82 mm., actual measurement, on the RSpec.
Larger throttle bodies have long been a proven, easy, no downside mod. with General Motors LS series motors. For instance my early Z06 5.7 liter motor had a 78 mm throttle body. I changed it for an aftermarket 90 mm. throttle body. Good power increase with no mileage decrease - my definition of a good mod.
Presently, no one offers larger throttle bodies for Hyundai V8s. BUT there is a company in Florida which will machine your throttle body increasing its bore by a few mm. for $99, return shipping included. They do a very fast turn around. It took exactly a week for me to ship/return via Priority Mail from OR to FL.
The site is www.maxbore.com.
They bored my throttle body to 85 mm., not a huge change. Their work is simply "beautiful", better than OEM. I immediately felt a noticeable power increase.
 

GenesisCaptain

Registered Member
656
2
18
Cool. Couple that with your CAI, a larger intake, freer flowing exhaust, and the engine computer tuning to match, and you are talking real power potential with virtually no down side.

The thing we really need is tuning to the transmission computer. That sucker sucks. It does not seem to know when to kick down and how many gears to kick down. The car is quick once it gets to the right gear, but it feels like it can take 2-3 seconds at times between WOT and transmission response.
 

Rey

Registered Member
643
3
18
Salem, OR
The Sprint Booster definitely helps transmission response. It is not a complete fix or cure, but it will make you happier, I think. It worked for me.
______________________________
 

ghicks99

Been here awhile...
The OEM throttle body bore measures about 80 mm. (my recall) on the 4.6 and 82 mm., actual measurement, on the RSpec.
Larger throttle bodies have long been a proven, easy, no downside mod. with General Motors LS series motors. For instance my early Z06 5.7 liter motor had a 78 mm throttle body. I changed it for an aftermarket 90 mm. throttle body. Good power increase with no mileage decrease - my definition of a good mod.
Presently, no one offers larger throttle bodies for Hyundai V8s. BUT there is a company in Florida which will machine your throttle body increasing its bore by a few mm. for $99, return shipping included. They do a very fast turn around. It took exactly a week for me to ship/return via Priority Mail from OR to FL.
The site is www.maxbore.com.
They bored my throttle body to 85 mm., not a huge change. Their work is simply "beautiful", better than OEM. I immediately felt a noticeable power increase.
Totally agree. I came from a trailblazer SS with an LS2 and had a 90mm on mine. Definitely cheap and easy horsepower
 

Rey

Registered Member
643
3
18
Salem, OR
I have a couple thousand miles on the bored throttle body now. Can say that I notice no material loss of gas mileage. Perhaps, just a bit better gas mileage - maybe due to more turbulence at small throttle settings.
Note also, I disconnected the coolant lines to the throttle body and connected them together. This is a very old trick from the GM folks. Heating the throttle body is a solution to a non-existent problem - icing. Much of the time this throttle body heat just serves to increase intake air temperature.
 

Little_Jason

Registered Member
Note also, I disconnected the coolant lines to the throttle body and connected them together. This is a very old trick from the GM folks. Heating the throttle body is a solution to a non-existent problem - icing. Much of the time this throttle body heat just serves to increase intake air temperature.
Can you go into some more details about this mod even possible photos, but I think if you decide to do a write up it would be best to start your own thread. thank you.
 

QuantumRift

Been here awhile...
802
18
18
Central OH
Coolant thru the throttle body serves the purpose of aiding the engine to come up to temp faster and use less fuel in cold weather as cold (as in really cold air) doesn't allow fuel to vaporize or stay vaporized very well.

One of the first 'mods' I did on my '06 Sonata was to install a small bypass fitting on the TB coolant line. As i was living in SE Arizona, it really wasn't necessary as most of the year the temperature wasn't that bad, and in really really HOT weather, the last thing I want to do is to heat up already HOT air being sucked into the engine. Did I notice any change in peformance? Not really. MPG? Maybe a small bit worse in cold (20 deg) weather and a small increase in very HOT (100 deg) weather. I eventually traded the car for the Genny anyways.

Remember the old 60's and 70's car that had that snorkel and flapper that sucked intake air from around the exhaust manifold? Similar idea, and the flapper was supposed to CLOSE as the engine heated up and not divert hot air from the manifold. Those things sucked and failed all the time.

If one does not exist, then perhaps one should be invented that simply diverts the coolant to the throttle body in VERY COLD weather and then shunts it after warm up or in very HOT weather.

But back to the statement that you 'felt' a performance increase when you got the TB back and installed it....for $100 I'd need more than a 'feeling' that a very small increase in bore makes a noticeable difference in HP. I'd like to see a 'before and after' dyno test or SOMETHING. I can FEEL my car has better performance if I dump a can of Sea Foam in the tank....see what I'm saying? If it boosts my car 3 HP, is it worth $100? As I said in another thread about fuel, I'm not that astute in determining if a change I make gives me 3 HP or not. I'm not running it at the strip or at Talledega....LoL...though I wish I could.
______________________________
 

Rey

Registered Member
643
3
18
Salem, OR
I did a fair amount of research on the subject of throttle body heating; and discussed it at length on the Jaguar Engines Forum (did this to my Jaguar also). Basically, the purpose of the coolant heating the throttle body is to prevent icing in the throttle body. While I suppose that hotter intake air might decrease warm up time, I found no research whatsoever that included this aspect.
What I know is that throttle body icing has the same origin as carburetor icing. Icing occurs on an almost closed throttle, and high humidity and otherwise cold motor. For instance, were you to start a cold motor and immediately descend a grade with throttle closed. This can occur when ambient air is above freezing. As the humid air crosses the throttle plate it speeds up (Bernolli Principle) and in doing so this air temp drops, sometimes enough to cause ice to occur. Carburetor icing is a more frequent potential for aircraft descending on closed throttle through humid cloud banks.
As for any "difference", do not expect much. This is just one of those little mods that costs almost nothing. All you need is a brass rubber tube connector, which NAPA stores usually stock.
As for modding your throttle body, I think this is entirely an individual decision. I'm not "selling" the idea and have no financial interest whatsoever in MaxBore. I don't have ready access to a dyno; and perhaps someday I will dyno the car again. I do not try to "justify" to myself a $100 mod. or, for that matter any mod. Personally, I do not require a mod "pay for itself" in increased gas mileage. I used to run calculations on potential fuel savings and how long the payback period would be. Concluded, that the mods I was considering would never pay for themselves over the period of my ownership. Also concluded that it didn't matter to me. It is all part of my "hobby" if you will. I like to modify my vehicles, and have the money to do whatever I want. Have been doing it for over fifty years now. I try to increase horsepower/torque/driveability, but without degrading gas mileage. Most of my mods are small tweaks. A mod will pass my "test" if my wife does not notice.
 

brfatal

Been here awhile...
575
2
0
VA
I did the throttle body coolant bypass on my WRX back when I lived in Texas. Now that I live in a place where it does get colder, I would not do it. The affects of coolant flow in the throttle body are not noticeable at all, just as the "gains" from bypassing it would be negligible as well. I say gains as in theoretically there will be something, but it won't be a large enough number to register past the standard deviations you get in testing before and after on a dyno. Gains of less than ~10 whp can't really be detected on a dyno due to different conditions between runs.
 

QuantumRift

Been here awhile...
802
18
18
Central OH
Yea us pilots know a little about about 'carb heat settings. LOL. The first thing I did when I got my 2nd '06 Sonata was install the TB bypass on it. As I lived in AZ at the time I had very little concern about 'warm' up and TB icing.


I did a fair amount of research on the subject of throttle body heating; and discussed it at length on the Jaguar Engines Forum (did this to my Jaguar also). Basically, the purpose of the coolant heating the throttle body is to prevent icing in the throttle body. While I suppose that hotter intake air might decrease warm up time, I found no research whatsoever that included this aspect.
What I know is that throttle body icing has the same origin as carburetor icing. Icing occurs on an almost closed throttle, and high humidity and otherwise cold motor. For instance, were you to start a cold motor and immediately descend a grade with throttle closed. This can occur when ambient air is above freezing. As the humid air crosses the throttle plate it speeds up (Bernolli Principle) and in doing so this air temp drops, sometimes enough to cause ice to occur. Carburetor icing is a more frequent potential for aircraft descending on closed throttle through humid cloud banks.
As for any "difference", do not expect much. This is just one of those little mods that costs almost nothing. All you need is a brass rubber tube connector, which NAPA stores usually stock.
As for modding your throttle body, I think this is entirely an individual decision. I'm not "selling" the idea and have no financial interest whatsoever in MaxBore. I don't have ready access to a dyno; and perhaps someday I will dyno the car again. I do not try to "justify" to myself a $100 mod. or, for that matter any mod. Personally, I do not require a mod "pay for itself" in increased gas mileage. I used to run calculations on potential fuel savings and how long the payback period would be. Concluded, that the mods I was considering would never pay for themselves over the period of my ownership. Also concluded that it didn't matter to me. It is all part of my "hobby" if you will. I like to modify my vehicles, and have the money to do whatever I want. Have been doing it for over fifty years now. I try to increase horsepower/torque/driveability, but without degrading gas mileage. Most of my mods are small tweaks. A mod will pass my "test" if my wife does not notice.
______________________________
 

NJTom

Registered Member
131
0
16
Central PA
are throttle bodies interchangeable between the genesis v6 and v8 engines? The 2009-2011 v6 throttles are 77 mm and can be bored to 81 mm (per maxbore.com). if the 4.6 is 80 mm and the 5.0 is 82 mm and are easily interchangeable, then it may be an easy replacement part.

Has anyone tried? thanks.
 

MG8

Hasn't posted much yet...
62
7
8
are throttle bodies interchangeable between the genesis v6 and v8 engines? The 2009-2011 v6 throttles are 77 mm and can be bored to 81 mm (per maxbore.com). if the 4.6 is 80 mm and the 5.0 is 82 mm and are easily interchangeable, then it may be an easy replacement part.

Has anyone tried? thanks.
RSPEC 82 MM ? good to know
 
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