New Genesis owner seeking advice on repair.

AlenZJ

New member
5
0
1
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Hello everyone,

I'm new to this website and community. I just purchased a used 2009 Genesis sedan 3.8 with 59,000 miles from a dealership. It has every option and package available on that model. I have just a few questions that I hope someone can help me with.

First things first, the sunroof malfunctioned while I test drove the car. It made violent clicking and popping sounds when sliding front and back and tilting up and down. It eventually became stuck with the left side tilted down and the right side still open tilted up. The mechanic the dealer referred me to showed me the broken plastic pieces that allowed the sunroof to tilt up and down. They managed to get the sunroof shut and it is sealed (I tested it by driving through a car wash with no leaks). They also disconnected the slide/tilt button from the motor as to not accidentally open it for the time being. Now, the dealer offered me 2 options, first option: refund me $500-$600 off the price I purchased the car for, or second option: pay to fix the sunroof. What would you all recommend because according to some quick research, I've found that the sun roofs on these vehicles seem to be breaking somewhat often even on newer models. One thing to note, I never EVER used my previous sunroof in my old 06 Elantra which I owned for 7 years and I prefer always driving with all windows rolled up anyways.

Second issue, The test drive led me to believe everything was running fine mechanically. Smooth ride, smooth gear shifts, transmission felt slightly worn but nothing too alarming. Engine made no weird sounds, breaks felt good, electronics were working, and overall me and my friend who came with me (he knows cars) deemed it mechanically sound. The Carfax showed regular maintenance and inspections throughout it's life with the most recent vehicle inspection being in late 2018. The day after purchasing it, the check engine light came on. We tried disconnecting the battery and closing the gas cap to see if it were just a simple hiccup. The light remains on whenever the car is running. It still runs and feels great when driving, it even says I'm averaging 27 mpg (I drive very light on the gas). Would any of you be super concerned that it is a mechanical/engine issue?

I have no warranties on the car and am just a little worried something bad and expensive is going to need to be repaired.

Thanks in advance!
 

homeofstone

Registered Member
3,472
39
48
Athens, Georgia, USA
Have a scan done to find out why the CEL is on. then have it fixed. One malfunction can lead to others if not fixed. I would make dealer fix sunroof at no charge. These cars will last well over 200,000 miles when maintained properly.
 

gstang662002

New member
7
1
3
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I would agree with homeofstone.

Have them fix the sunroof and they should give you a decent warranty on the labor and parts if the dealership is worth a crap.

Buy an OBDII scanner on Amazon. A cheap one is less than $50 now and if you get a better one it can pull all past codes (I scanned mine before I bought it just to make sure no one had erased one). Autozone will read it if you don't have one. I think you should fix the CEL issues as it may not be an issue now, but may become an issue later even if it is just with gas mileage.
 

AlenZJ

New member
5
0
1
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Have a scan done to find out why the CEL is on. then have it fixed. One malfunction can lead to others if not fixed. I would make dealer fix sunroof at no charge. These cars will last well over 200,000 miles when maintained properly.
Just got it scanned and this was the only code being shown. Any thoughts?
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EdP

Supporting Member
SUPPORTING MEMBER
SUSTAINING MEMBER
3,723
915
113
Parrish, FL
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G80

pmckechnie

Registered Member
254
24
18
Matthews, NC
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G80
Put a new gas cap on and have the code erased. That is the most common cause of this code but not the only one.
It probably won't cause a problem with the car but with the light on you won't know if something else happens that will cause problems.
As far as the sunroof goes, I personally would take the money. My G80 has NO sunroof. My old Mersedes 500SEL has a metal sunroof that hasn't been opened but 1 time in the last 15 years and that was just a test to see if it worked when I got the car. But that just me. I will never own a car with a glass top.
 

AlenZJ

New member
5
0
1
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Just replaced the gas cap but the light remains. Guess I'll have to have an apparent "smoke test" done for $99 at tires plus.
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Ducatislave

Hasn't posted much yet...
42
6
8
Georgetown, TX
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Just replaced the gas cap but the light remains. Guess I'll have to have an apparent "smoke test" done for $99 at tires plus.
Hold that thought, i recall seeing something on the tsb's or possibly a recall on that, something to do with the vapor canister mounting points cracking. i will do some digging ans post what i find.
 

Ducatislave

Hasn't posted much yet...
42
6
8
Georgetown, TX
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Ok, so here is the TSB I was recalling. It is not for the Genesis as I had thought, however it lists your code and a good place to check for that leak.
The other method you can use is to take all of the vanity covers off of the engine and with the engine running at operating temp do a propane test. Its old school but it works. you take a green camping stove size bottle of propane with a valve and a fairly long piece of surgical tubing start supplying a moderate flow of propane around and along each vacuum line and connection. If you hear the engine pickup RPM momentarily at one spot then you know the general point to start searching for a cracked line or fitting. What you are looking for is a hairline crack, either in a fitting or in the sidewall of a hose, it may not even be visible to the naked eye. you will need to move the hoses around and squeeze them to be certain. Also, as you are moving the hose over the lines and fittings, look for and check all the vacuum connections to ensure that they are properly attached, if something was removed during service it may not have gotten pushed back on all the way, or got pulled on by accident and no one even noticed.
It should go without saying that while you need to have the vehicle shielded from any breeze for this to work. HOWEVER, one should not do this in an enclosed space, your garage will work fine but keep the door open so that the propane does not accumulate and cause a flash fire. Be sure to extinguish all potential sources of ignition (water heaters, shop heater etc...)
I accept no liability for the use of this procedure, and common sense is a must.
Be sure to keep the hose and bottle as well as your own appendages clear of any/all moving parts.
$6-8 for a bottle of propane and a few bucks for some surgical tubing is a lot better than $100 for that smoke test. yes?

Hope this helps.
 

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mikec

Registered Member
589
3
18
SoCal
Unplugging the battery won't clear OBD-II codes generally. The evap code will self-clear AFTER the car has been driven a while - a couple of hours worth - if the problem has been fixed. Just installing a new gas cap won't clear an evap code immediately even if the old gas cap was the problem. Why? The way most cars monitor for leaks in the fuel system, gas tank, etc. - all the stuff that leads to the evap code - is to watch the air pressure in the gas tank. As you drive and burn gas out of the tank a small vacuum builds up. Eventually the spring-loaded flapper door in the gas cap pops open to let outside air into the tank which quickly reduces the vacuum. The engine computer has an air pressure sensor that monitors the fuel tank vacuum and it expects vacuum to build up at a certain rate as you drive (because it knows how much fuel the engine has burned)... and then to HOLD that vacuum when the engine is OFF. So you have to drive for a while to a) get vacuum in the tank again and b) have the engine OFF for a while so the computer can verify the vacuum holds. Many such "soft" OBD-II codes need 3 full "driving cycles" to self-clear.

If you use an OBD-II scan tool to erase the evap code that'll of course turn the "check engine" light off immediately. If the evap system is functioning properly the light will stay out forever... if there is a problem though the light may come on fairly quickly or it may take a week or two of driving depending on how frequently and how far you actually drive.

Evap errors though are all indicative of minor leaks in the fuel tank, or the fuel lines, or vacuum hoses under the hood, the charcoal emissions canister (aka evaporative emissions canister), etc. NONE of those are "mechanical" issues with the engine, transmission, etc. At worst it would mean a gas tank with a leak, a bent fitting where the gas cap attaches (so it can't seal properly), the purge valve, or canister itself have leaks. Simple parts and not terribly expensive.

So what is the evap system and why does it exist? Gas sitting in the tank - while you are driving or when the car is parked - wants to evaporate. The fumes that are produced try to get out any way they can... just like a room full of smoke. The charcoal canister aka evaporative emissions canister is basically a box of activated charcoal/carbon (think "Odor Eaters" for the fuel system) that absorbs those fumes. There is a pipe/hose from the fuel tank to the canister to route those fumes to the canister. Once the engine is running and warmed up the purge control valve is opened to allow normal engine intake manifold vacuum (the same vacuum that draws air past the throttle plates and into the piston/cylinder chambers) to suck on the canister... sucking the charcoal-trapped fumes back out so they can be burned in the engine. This cleans the canister. The whole point of this system is to limit gas fumes/vapors from oozing out of the car anywhere - even from oozing out the gas filler when you take the gas cap off to re-fill the tank. Of course leaving the cap off for days lets fumes out... but little escape when you fill-up because the charcoal canister has (hopefully) absorbed most of the vapors in the tank. Fun fact: most modern cars emit less pollution while idling or driving than early 1970's and prior model year cars emitted WHILE PARKED WITH THE ENGINE OFF! Those old cars let gas tank fumes escape while parked... more pollution than what comes out of modern car tailpipes today.

mike c.
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mikec

Registered Member
589
3
18
SoCal
Oh, as for the sunroof: I'd still get it fixed even if you never plan to use it. You never know when it might need to be opened: when you go to sell/trade the car perhaps, if something damages the roof body/paint and a shop needs to get the sunroof out of the way, or even replace the water seals along the edge if you keep the car a long time. I rarely use the sunroof on my Genesis... most of the time I'm opening it to get it out of the way when I'm waxing the paint!

mike c.
 

AlenZJ

New member
5
0
1
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Update: smoke test revealed that the leak was coming from somewhere between the place where you actually put the gas pump and the actual gas tank, I forget what the specific part was the guy told me was the issue. Getting it fixed and serviced for it's scheduled 60,000 mile service. Thanks for all the help everyone!
 

AlenZJ

New member
5
0
1
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Hey everyone, back again.

So my check engine light came back about 5 days after getting my evap leak fixed. The code is the same exact one (very small evap leak) as previously posted. Should I be concerned or do you think it's just a faulty computer reading/sensor or whatever? I'm taking it back in 4 days once I have a day off. Should I be worried about driving it until then?
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Ducatislave

Hasn't posted much yet...
42
6
8
Georgetown, TX
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
No, the car is plenty capable of compensating for that. All it will cause is a slightly leaner mixture, which should be detected by the O2 sensors and adjusted. In 13 years of working on cars i have never seen any damage done solely as the result of a vacuum leak.
 

Ducatislave

Hasn't posted much yet...
42
6
8
Georgetown, TX
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Additionally, your comment about a sensor caused me to think back. It may be a faulty MAP sensor or Barometric sensor. If either of those are off it may cause the vehicle to think that a leak exists when it doesn't.
 

SwollO

New member
9
0
1
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Take it to o'reilly or autozone to get a free scan done to figure out what code is causing the engine light to come on
 
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