Signs that your battery is dying?

bueller555

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I still have the OEM battery on my 2009 Genesis 3.8. I'm noticing period lags when pressing the push start or unlocking the doors. Can the dealer test to see if the battery is due for a replacement or should I simply replace it for peace of mind?

Also, is there any real savings by trying to replace the battery outside of the dealer? Thanks.
 

landtuna

Registered Member
695
7
18
Sandstorm, AZ
I still have the OEM battery on my 2009 Genesis 3.8. I'm noticing period lags when pressing the push start or unlocking the doors. Can the dealer test to see if the battery is due for a replacement or should I simply replace it for peace of mind?

Also, is there any real savings by trying to replace the battery outside of the dealer? Thanks.
You can take the car to any auto shop and they can do a "load test" which will ascertain the condition of the battery. If the battery is 3 years or older it probably makes sense just to replace it as you won't have a whole lot more life even it is is good today. And yes, you can buy a new battery cheaper almost anywhere than at the dealer.

If you disconnect the battery yourself bear in mind that all electrical equipment in the car will need to be reset. To prevent this put a "battery maintainer" online before removing the battery.
 

Mark_888

Registered Member
13,335
137
63
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I still have the OEM battery on my 2009 Genesis 3.8. I'm noticing period lags when pressing the push start or unlocking the doors. Can the dealer test to see if the battery is due for a replacement or should I simply replace it for peace of mind?

Also, is there any real savings by trying to replace the battery outside of the dealer? Thanks.
I wonder if that is the battery in your keyfob. Some tasks won't work unless the keyfob is recognized and inside the cabin.
 

bueller555

Getting familiar with the group...
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Keyfob batteries are new. The door unlockings are done "manually".

I read on this forum that the Genesis battery is an unusual type. I have NAPA, Carquest, O'Reillys, Costco and Sam's Club available nearby. Anyone know if these places carry these batteries or do I have to find a battery place?
______________________________
 

Mark_888

Registered Member
13,335
137
63
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Keyfob batteries are new. The door unlockings are done "manually".

I read on this forum that the Genesis battery is an unusual type. I have NAPA, Carquest, O'Reillys, Costco and Sam's Club available nearby. Anyone know if these places carry these batteries or do I have to find a battery place?
They are very large batteries (H8), but I noticed that even Walmart now has that size.

I noticed that you didn't list Autozone, but I have had very good luck with their Duralast batteries (but the good ones are not cheap):
  • Duralast Gold/Battery: H8-DLG
  • Duralast Platinum/Battery: H8-AGM
I am not sure which one of the above is best. The Platinum is a AGM battery (like Optima) which differs from flooded lead acid batteries in that the electrolyte is held in the glass mats, as opposed to freely flooding the plates.

They will install it for free in the parking lot, so you don't have to bring the old one back for $15.00 core charge.
 

GenesisCaptain

Registered Member
656
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I still have the OEM battery on my 2009 Genesis 3.8. I'm noticing period lags when pressing the push start or unlocking the doors. Can the dealer test to see if the battery is due for a replacement or should I simply replace it for peace of mind?

Also, is there any real savings by trying to replace the battery outside of the dealer? Thanks.
I know from experience with other makes that an old battery does very weird things like this to a car long before you ever notice a problem starting the car. So yes, I would say that this could be signs of a dying battery.

Also, I know from much personal experience that a traditional load test will not help you. I do not know exactly what a battery load test tests, but it is not effective for modern computer-controlled cars. In my cars and cars of family and friends, old batteries passed a load test, but the weird car symptoms went away with the new battery. So, just go get a new battery and live in peace.

Finally, many new cars have advanced charging systems that extend battery life by controlling the charge rate and intervals. In these cars, the dealer has to tell the charging system that the car has a new battery upon replacement. (If not, the battery will prematurely age, because the car thinks it is still an old battery and charges it differently.) I have no clue if our Genesis cars have this kind of charging system. If it does, then get the dealer to reset it after you replace the battery. If not, then just buy the best battery value and install it.
 

Jimmmmbo!

Been here awhile...
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Twin Cities, MN
I still have the OEM battery on my 2009 Genesis 3.8. I'm noticing period lags when pressing the push start or unlocking the doors. Can the dealer test to see if the battery is due for a replacement or should I simply replace it for peace of mind?

Also, is there any real savings by trying to replace the battery outside of the dealer? Thanks.
IMHO as an EE, it takes many AMPS to start your car versus the MilliAmps (1000x less current / energy than AMPS in simple terms) to power door locks, the computer, your radio / stereo / nav system, and other. I seriously doubt that a "lag" in response is battery-related. You are more likely to experience the "tick-tick-tick" or lower "chugging" of the starter to start your car before any of these other electrical concerns.

That being said, don't ignore your battery health and longevity. OEM car batteries are not known for longevity and depending on your use can either die quickly or last for a number of years. Batteries are one of the lousiest reliability items in a car (lead-acid) that most people think will last longer than they do. If you suspect a battery issue after a few years, don't be afraid to buy one and store it on the shelf (if possible).
 

landtuna

Registered Member
695
7
18
Sandstorm, AZ
Also, I know from much personal experience that a traditional load test will not help you. I do not know exactly what a battery load test tests, but it is not effective for modern computer-controlled cars.
You do not know what a load test tests yet you know it won't help diagnose a dying battery?

A load test measures the ability of a battery to deliver power under load as if the battery were trying to start the engine (the largest drain on a car battery). If all cells are not working properly and not internally shorting the load test will show it. It is the most drastic test you can place upon a car battery.

Modern computer-controlled cars are no different than their ancestors except that those computers require constant power or they might need to be reset or re-authorized following a power outage - hence the use of a "memory minder" while switching batteries.

In my cars and cars of family and friends, old batteries passed a load test, but the weird car symptoms went away with the new battery. So, just go get a new battery and live in peace.
Your "weird car symptoms" were due to interruptions in power delivery (corroded terminals, broken wires, bad solder joints etc.) and not the battery. Any battery passing a load test (if done properly) has enough power to operate the electric system. Any interruption is due to other factors.

Finally, many new cars have advanced charging systems that extend battery life by controlling the charge rate and intervals. In these cars, the dealer has to tell the charging system that the car has a new battery upon replacement. (If not, the battery will prematurely age, because the car thinks it is still an old battery and charges it differently.) I have no clue if our Genesis cars have this kind of charging system. If it does, then get the dealer to reset it after you replace the battery. If not, then just buy the best battery value and install it.
Car batteries are designed to provide their maximum power output at engine start and thereafter be "topped off" by operation of the alternator. The alternator has a circuit that "bleeds off" power that is not needed to charge the battery and thus not overheat it and evaporate the electrolyte. Alternators have had this capability since the early 60's when alternators became standard in cars. Even generators had similar circuitry for decades before that.

If you disconnect your car battery in a modern car you may interrupt certain electrical circuits and this may require resetting certain equipment such as radios, nav systems etc. Some cars have security settings which must be coded once battery power is established. There is nothing in the Genesis (nor most other cars) that require a dealer to notify the car that a new battery is being installed. The alternator will charge at the rate determined by the condition of the battery, new or old.

Car batteries last longer in colder climates than in hot. Take this into consideration when considering replacement intervals.
______________________________
 

Mark_888

Registered Member
13,335
137
63
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
Car batteries last longer in colder climates than in hot. Take this into consideration when considering replacement intervals.
Some retailers/manufacturers have different battery versions for North and South.
  • The ones in the south have stronger walls to deal with damage caused by excessive heat, which means there is a little less room for internal chambers and a little less cold cranking amps. But that is OK, since owners are not having start their cars in freezing weather as much.
  • North batteries have thinner walls for maximum internal space and higher cold cranking amps.
It gets a little more complicated for OEM batteries, especially if the cars are built in foreign countries where it is usually not too hot.
 

GenesisCaptain

Registered Member
656
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A load test measures the ability of a battery to deliver power under load as if the battery were trying to start the engine (the largest drain on a car battery). If all cells are not working properly and not internally shorting the load test will show it. It is the most drastic test you can place upon a car battery.

Modern computer-controlled cars are no different than their ancestors except that those computers require constant power or they might need to be reset or re-authorized following a power outage - hence the use of a "memory minder" while switching batteries.
My point is that I did not feel like Googling it because my comments summarize the collective experiences of my 12 years of ownership and very well documented experiences of several highly active forums with expert owners. My hunch is that the old school load tests are looking for high amperage delivery for a measured period of time. But, an aging battery can pass that test while it still causes voltage sags in the electrical system that wreak havoc on computer modules.

Modern computer cars are very different in that they computers are highly sensitive to voltage or amperage variations. Old solid state cars never had this problem because they were highly tolerant of voltage swings.

Whatever a load test tests, it was irrelevant. Because all of us BMW owners knew that when the car locks stopped responding, the radio shut off mysteriously, you got a Transmission Failsafe error, the nav system shut down, etc., that it was time to change the battery.

Your "weird car symptoms" were due to interruptions in power delivery (corroded terminals, broken wires, bad solder joints etc.) and not the battery. Any battery passing a load test (if done properly) has enough power to operate the electric system. Any interruption is due to other factors.
No, this was absolutely caused by the battery. Most of the owners cleaned the terminals and checked everything. That did not change the behaviors. Simply changing the batteries fixed it. Most of the owners also had a load test. I have first-hand experience with multiple batteries over my 12 years of ownership. Many others shared the exact same experiences and resolutions.

Car batteries are designed to provide their maximum power output at engine start and thereafter be "topped off" by operation of the alternator. The alternator has a circuit that "bleeds off" power that is not needed to charge the battery and thus not overheat it and evaporate the electrolyte. Alternators have had this capability since the early 60's when alternators became standard in cars. Even generators had similar circuitry for decades before that.

If you disconnect your car battery in a modern car you may interrupt certain electrical circuits and this may require resetting certain equipment such as radios, nav systems etc. Some cars have security settings which must be coded once battery power is established. There is nothing in the Genesis (nor most other cars) that require a dealer to notify the car that a new battery is being installed. The alternator will charge at the rate determined by the condition of the battery, new or old.
BMW switched to modern adaptive charging systems with the 2004 5 Series. (I think. It may have been in the 2002 7 Series.) Now they have the systems across their entire model line. Mercedes switched to these systems too, and I think Audi uses them. It is totally different from the charging systems that have been around since the 60s. They still have alternators, but they have advanced switching and power control that cares for the battery. The do require a reset from the dealer's proprietary diagnostics system when you install a new battery, otherwise it will shorten the life of the replacement battery.
 

GenesisCaptain

Registered Member
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IMHO as an EE, it takes many AMPS to start your car versus the MilliAmps (1000x less current / energy than AMPS in simple terms) to power door locks, the computer, your radio / stereo / nav system, and other. I seriously doubt that a "lag" in response is battery-related. You are more likely to experience the "tick-tick-tick" or lower "chugging" of the starter to start your car before any of these other electrical concerns.
I am an EE also. And, a good friend with a similar car was also an EE who had retired from a lifetime of engineering with Lockheed Martin. This did not fit within our obvious understanding of circuits. Plus, here is a data point that will really make you scratch your head: these symptoms occur even with the engine running and the alternator charging...

Most of the car is controlled by computer modules that communicate over a serial CAN bus. (Modern cars have shifted to a fiber optic bus, but the behaviors are the same.) Our theory is that slight voltage lags in the system cause a hiccup in a computer module that then sends junk over the communication bus. The junk then interrupts other modules.

The confusing thing to us circuits guys is that the symptoms should go away with the alternator engaged. A voltmeter on the battery and the car's internal voltmeter show 13V - 14V (totally in spec). The mystery we did not answer is what could be going on within a five-year-old battery cause stuff like this.
 
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landtuna

Registered Member
695
7
18
Sandstorm, AZ
My point is that I did not feel like Googling it because my comments summarize the collective experiences of my 12 years of ownership and very well documented experiences of several highly active forums with expert owners. My hunch is that the old school load tests are looking for high amperage delivery for a measured period of time. But, an aging battery can pass that test while it still causes voltage sags in the electrical system that wreak havoc on computer modules.
There is nothing "old school" about load testing a battery. The load test measures the ability of the battery to deliver starting power and is the best test to measure a failing battery. A battery which cannot pass the load test has already failed although there might be enough capacity left to operate low power equipment such as lights and radio.

Whatever a load test tests, it was irrelevant. Because all of us BMW owners knew that when the car locks stopped responding, the radio shut off mysteriously, you got a Transmission Failsafe error, the nav system shut down, etc., that it was time to change the battery.
I am not familiar with BMW's but they do not make the load test irrelevant. BMW may have other circuitry that malfunctions when the battery voltage drops below a certain point and those may be more critical than the starter but the load test is still the time-honored and most accurate measure of battery life.

No, this was absolutely caused by the battery. Most of the owners cleaned the terminals and checked everything. That did not change the behaviors. Simply changing the batteries fixed it. Most of the owners also had a load test. I have first-hand experience with multiple batteries over my 12 years of ownership. Many others shared the exact same experiences and resolutions.
Amazing that you know the intimate details of all those other owners. It wouldn't occur to me to speak for the hundreds or thousands of Genny owners in this regard.

Nevertheless, I have been working on cars since the age of 8, have built hot rods, classics and even a C gas rail. Each of those classes has their particular characteristics and your experience with Bimmers may be unique. That does not change the overall experience of hundreds of millions of other car owners.

BMW switched to modern adaptive charging systems with the 2004 5 Series. (I think. It may have been in the 2002 7 Series.) Now they have the systems across their entire model line. Mercedes switched to these systems too, and I think Audi uses them. It is totally different from the charging systems that have been around since the 60s. They still have alternators, but they have advanced switching and power control that cares for the battery. The do require a reset from the dealer's proprietary diagnostics system when you install a new battery, otherwise it will shorten the life of the replacement battery.
If true, it is a good reason not to own one of those vehicles. Perhaps your fellow German car owners could poll themselves and figure out if all that unneeded complexity contributes substantially to improved battery life or not.
______________________________
 

landtuna

Registered Member
695
7
18
Sandstorm, AZ
The confusing thing to us circuits guys is that the symptoms should go away with the alternator engaged. A voltmeter on the battery and the car's internal voltmeter show 13V - 14V (totally in spec). The mystery we did not answer is what could be going on within a five-year-old battery cause stuff like this.
Lead-acid batteries suffer from failure of the plates which cause conductive material to slough down at the bottom of the battery. If enough of this material collects it can cause short circuits within the cells. These shorts can come and go as the electrolyte sloshes around. A small short between two cells can cause enough of a voltage drop to momentarily affect the vehicle sub-systems. Eventually a strong short will occur and that is when one or both of the affected cells goes "dead".

AGM batteries attempt to prevent the deterioration of the plates by using a gel electrolyte instead of liquid and also by wrapping the plates to prevent pieces from falling off. The gel also evaporates far less rapidly than liquid.
 

GenesisCaptain

Registered Member
656
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I am not familiar with BMW's but they do not make the load test irrelevant... It wouldn't occur to me to speak for the hundreds or thousands of Genny owners in this regard...If true, it is a good reason not to own one of those vehicles. Perhaps your fellow German car owners could poll themselves and figure out if all that unneeded complexity contributes substantially to improved battery life or not.
I did not mean to create a big debate. The major point is that computer-controlled cars are much more susceptible new electronics symptoms that simply did not exist 20 years ago. A load test may not test all of the factors that can affect a car's behavior. In the case of BMWs, Mercedes, and Audi, a load test definitely does not discover a battery problem. When a Genesis owner asks if replacing a battery might fix lags locking the doors, the answer has to be "yes," based on its technology and similar symptoms appearing in many other types of cars. Our cars are young, and the oldest model years are just approaching the timeframe when they will need battery replacements. We do not have a whole lot of data about our cars yet as they age.

My statements in no way speak for all of the BMW owners or all of the Genesis owners. I don't think I wrote anything that suggested I knew the intimate details of hundreds of millions of owners. My comments do speak directly to my personal experiences with my two two cars, my parent's three cars, my brother-in-law's car, several close friends, and many others on multiple forums who experienced and solved the same problems simply by replacing the battery.

To the last point about the advanced charging systems in European cars, there is no if. It is very real, and it has been around for a decade. Most BMW owners do not understand it and hate it. EXBMWGUY used to have an E60 5 Series. If he had his car long enough to replace the battery, he can attest to the ridiculous $400 battery replacement service. Maybe he will chime in. All that said, with the emphasis on green technologies and extending battery life, it is only a matter of time before most cars employ this technology. BMW's failure is that it takes a technician and a diagnostics computer to do the reset. That should be a user action through the car's on-board computer.

Lead-acid batteries suffer from failure of the plates which cause conductive material to slough down at the bottom of the battery. If enough of this material collects it can cause short circuits within the cells. These shorts can come and go as the electrolyte sloshes around. A small short between two cells can cause enough of a voltage drop to momentarily affect the vehicle sub-systems. Eventually a strong short will occur and that is when one or both of the affected cells goes "dead."
Maybe this is it. It makes sense. Most times, the symptoms did occur while driving. And, they could occur any time, even after the battery was on a charger overnight and the car had been driven for a bit. As I noted on another post, the symptoms were all over the place in multiple systems:
  • Transmission computer throwing a "Transmission Failsafe" error
  • Blinkers working, but no click or lights on the instrument cluster
  • Hazard lights randomly turning on
  • Door locks lag to lock or unlock
  • Auto roll-down windows stop working
  • Auto door locks do not auto-lock
  • Radio randomly shutting off
  • Engine computer throws an "Engine Failsafe" error
  • And a few others I am happy to forget
 

Rudderman98

Registered Member
For a replacement battery, may I suggest the Sears Die Hard Platinum. This is the battery I have in my Suburban that has had electrical gremlins with several batteries and with this one, no problem at all and would highly recommend. No questions asked 4 year warranty if anything happens. This is what will be going in my Genny when it's battery wears out.

It is made by Enersys. Makers of the Odyssey battery. The battery is made of new ore pure lead. Not recycled lead.

I'm sure other drivers will have opinions on which battery they would use. This is my personal opinion and I don't want this thread to turn into a battery debate.

Here is more info on it.

http://www.enersys.com/

http://www.odysseybattery.com/

Here is the press release for Sears/Enersys.

EnerSys Signs Multi-Year Contract to Provide Sears Holdings With Long-Life DieHard(R) Platinum BatteriesREADING, Pa. and HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill., Feb. 27 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- EnerSys (NYSE: ENS), the world's largest manufacturer, marketer and distributor of industrial batteries, today announced it has signed a multi- year contract with Sears Holdings (Nasdaq: SHLD) to manufacture and supply Sears with a newly categorized DieHard Platinum branded battery for aftermarket automotive and marine applications. DieHard is America's most preferred automotive battery, among those stating a preference.
Beginning in March, 2007, Sears Auto Centers will be the exclusive distribution channel for DieHard Platinum batteries. "By working with EnerSys on the new DieHard Platinum battery, we continue the legacy of innovation that was established with the original DieHard battery 40 years ago," said Rick Sawyer, vice president/general merchandise manager of Sears Auto Centers. "We're confident this new battery will live up to the DieHard brand name and that users will be pleased with its performance. These premium-grade batteries are designed for a longer life than traditional batteries, offer increased levels of safe operation, can withstand extreme heat and cold, and are durable for consumer automotive/marine applications. The DieHard Platinum battery will offer proven vibration resistance to the consumer market.
The new DieHard Platinum batteries have up to 28% more Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) than comparatively sized spiral Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) batteries providing much more starting power to automobiles and boats, along with unmatched reserved capacity. These thin-plate pure-lead batteries will carry DieHard batteries' best-ever, free replacement warranty. See your local Sears store for written warranty details.
"We're thrilled to provide this high-end, durable DieHard Platinum version to consumers," said John Craig, chairman, president and chief executive officer of EnerSys. "This partnership represents a great opportunity for more users to benefit from our pure-lead technology products."
The DieHard Platinum batteries are manufactured in EnerSys' U.S. manufacturing facility in Warrensburg, Mo, where the first DieHard Platinum came off the production line today. They have a valve-regulated design that allows them to be installed in any orientation, except inverted, without spilling and the U.S. Department of Transportation has classified them as non- spillable for safe shipping.
For more information, contact Richard Zuidema, Executive Vice President, EnerSys, P.O. Box 14145, Reading, PA 19612-4145. Tel: 800/538-3627; Web site: EnerSys Home.
 

bueller555

Getting familiar with the group...
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Sears is my usual go to place for batteries, but when I searched on their website, it returns nothing for the Genesis. I guess the Genesis uses a Group 49 battery which is a little difficult to find. It seems to be a slightly less common battery size.

Thanks for all of the input, but I'll probably just go to the dealer and get it changed there. I'll inquire about their price at my next oil change and will ask them to do a load test at that time.
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EXBMWGUY

Been here awhile...
I did not mean to create a big debate. The major point is that computer-controlled cars are much more susceptible new electronics symptoms that simply did not exist 20 years ago. A load test may not test all of the factors that can affect a car's behavior. In the case of BMWs, Mercedes, and Audi, a load test definitely does not discover a battery problem. When a Genesis owner asks if replacing a battery might fix lags locking the doors, the answer has to be "yes," based on its technology and similar symptoms appearing in many other types of cars. Our cars are young, and the oldest model years are just approaching the timeframe when they will need battery replacements. We do not have a whole lot of data about our cars yet as they age.

My statements in no way speak for all of the BMW owners or all of the Genesis owners. I don't think I wrote anything that suggested I knew the intimate details of hundreds of millions of owners. My comments do speak directly to my personal experiences with my two two cars, my parent's three cars, my brother-in-law's car, several close friends, and many others on multiple forums who experienced and solved the same problems simply by replacing the battery.

To the last point about the advanced charging systems in European cars, there is no if. It is very real, and it has been around for a decade. Most BMW owners do not understand it and hate it. EXBMWGUY used to have an E60 5 Series. If he had his car long enough to replace the battery, he can attest to the ridiculous $400 battery replacement service. Maybe he will chime in. All that said, with the emphasis on green technologies and extending battery life, it is only a matter of time before most cars employ this technology. BMW's failure is that it takes a technician and a diagnostics computer to do the reset. That should be a user action through the car's on-board computer.


Maybe this is it. It makes sense. Most times, the symptoms did occur while driving. And, they could occur any time, even after the battery was on a charger overnight and the car had been driven for a bit. As I noted on another post, the symptoms were all over the place in multiple systems:
  • Transmission computer throwing a "Transmission Failsafe" error
  • Blinkers working, but no click or lights on the instrument cluster
  • Hazard lights randomly turning on
  • Door locks lag to lock or unlock
  • Auto roll-down windows stop working
  • Auto door locks do not auto-lock
  • Radio randomly shutting off
  • Engine computer throws an "Engine Failsafe" error
  • And a few others I am happy to forget
My recent BMW experience was quite limited (1 year, 22,000 miles) and was with a 2011 5-Series F10. If anything, the F10 is more complex in the areas being discussed here than the E60, especially equipped as my car was with every luxury option available. My car battery was never replaced, partly because its best friend was a battery tender that was religiously connected for periods where the car sat for one week or more. I learned this the hard way, but the battery survived. There were many small issues with my F10, all under warranty, that occurred with great frequency and inconvenience, that were indirectly related the battery, but primarily involved faulty software and electrical devices. Taken together, all these little issues made me feel like I was a hostage to, rather than an owner of, an otherwise fantastic car.

I can't speak to the load test issue, but will say that my son's 2004 E60 had its second OEM battery replaced at 130,000 miles with an aftermarket AGM battery from Advance Auto parts that cost under $200. Because my son knew somebody at the BMW dealership, it was easy and inexpensive for him to get the new battery registered to the car properly. Most people will pay dearly to have this done right.

Our cars may not be as complex or sophisticated as the German luxury brands, but nevertheless, the technology is very demanding. Cars with this level of tech are designed to maintain different levels of readiness to driver imputs, even if they are shut down. Imagine ANY car, just a few years ago, that knew when you approached the car, lit the surrounding area, and did a host of other things to make your drive so convenient!

I would never, never replace a battery a Genny with a non-AGM battery from any manufacturer. But I also don't believe it is necessary to always have your battery replaced by your dealer at a premium price, as long as all the proper steps are taken during installation.
 

Mark_888

Registered Member
13,335
137
63
Genesis Model Type
1G Genesis Sedan (2009-2014)
I would never, never replace a battery a Genny with a non-AGM battery from any manufacturer.
Are you saying that the Genesis OEM battery is an AGM design? I thought that the OEM Genesis batteries are vented with a tube in the trunk to expel dangerous fumes, and that AGM are completely sealed.
 

EXBMWGUY

Been here awhile...
Are you saying that the Genesis OEM battery is an AGM design? I thought that the OEM Genesis batteries are vented with a tube in the trunk to expel dangerous fumes, and that AGM are completely sealed.
My apologies - I didn't mean to imply that the original factory-installed battery was an AGM design (it is not) but only that an AGM is more suited to the car's electrical demands. I am disappointed in both Hyundai and Volvo for going quick, cheap and dirty with batteries in their multiple-computer, networked, tech-laden cars.

Group 49 batteries -both AGM and not - can be bought at Batteries+ stores, Advance Auto Parts, for sure, and probably a few others.

My personal experience with Diehard is not wonderful, although for many people I know it has been. The three Diehard batteries I purchased turned into six, because each one had to be replaced under their great warranty. So I was just more interested in buying a battery than a warranty. The new Diehard is just that - new, and a wonderful piece of marketing, for sure. Time will tell.
 

GPeaslee

Registered Member
My battery died this weekend, and here are some observations that might help answer the original question:

1) over the last 2 weeks my car started rough or had a slight hesitation compared to normal. I thought it was related to the temperature which had become cold.
2) the battery died abruptly. When trying to restart the car, the interior lights flashed randomly. I had to press the start button at least 5-6 times to stop the flashing.
3) the battery jump started fine. But when checking the battery with a test meter, the needle dropped, then came back up but continued to fluctuate.
4) the headlights and the display behind the steering wheel flickered slightly after jump starting the car.

My dealer installed a new battery. and everything is back to normal. Since the battery was less than 3 years old, they discounted the new battery.
 
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