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Genesis Forum: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan
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  1. #1
    Sayantsi's Avatar
    Sayantsi is offline Been here awhile... What I drive: 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Arrow Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

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    Since there's no good step-by-step yet, I decided to make one to help out the other shade tree mechanics. This is also an attempt to gather together the various info needed so we have the correct info in the correct place - if you see something missing - speak up! As far as oil changes go, this car is pretty simple.

    What you'll need:

    New Hyundai oil filter kit:
    Hyundai - #26330-3C300 (all o-rings and crush washer included) - Note: Hyundai has changed the part number a few times over the past two years as it combined V8 and V6 fitters. Just make sure the new filter matches the old and is stamped with 3C300. FYI, Hyundai's old part # - 26320-3C250
    Purolator - #L25848
    WIX - # 57250 (all o-rings and crush washer included)
    Ramps or a jack and jack stands
    6 quarts of oil - 5W-30 or 5W-20
    Oil pan that can hold at least 6 qt
    Funnel
    17mm socket and driver ratchet
    27mm box/crescent wrench or socket
    Size #0-1 flathead screwdriver (maybe a hole punch will work, or other small prying tool)
    Torque wrench(s) that can handle 18-33 lb ft
    Rubber mallet
    Needle nose pliers
    Rubber gloves to keep your hands clean
    Some shop rags
    Newspaper or other large coverage material to catch any errant oil
    Flashlight
    Clear work surface


    Oil change interval for normal use is every 7,500 miles. Get a Blackstone Labs ( http://www.blackstone-labs.com/free-test-kits.php ) used oil analysis after your first 10k mi and see if you are okay with that interval or can adjust it.


    Getting started:

    Prep your work surface - have your tools, oil and filter handy and place a cover on your work surface to catch oil.



    Make sure the engine is warm/hot.

    Pull of the engine cover. It is secured with four plug-connectors. Stand on the right or left and simply tug upwards and they will pop off. Place the cover someplace out of the way. Depending on how you set up, you may want to put down a ground cover now to catch any errant oil.

    Here's the bottom of the engine cover - note the four plug connectors:


    Either drive the car's front wheels up on ramps or jack the front of the car up and place your jack stands under the frame rails. DO NOT go under a jacked-up car without jack stands. Be sure to apply the parking brake in either case.

    The way the oil pan is designed, ramps work very well as the oil drain bolt is on the back of the pan - inclining the car seems to work for you when draining the oil.

    A note on jacking: If you jack the car to get to the drain bolt, you are probably best served by jacking one side of the car to remove the bolt, and then dropping the car back to level ground. To do this, you need to be sure that the drain pan clears the bottom of the car and that as you lower the car, the draining oil continues to hit the pan. Otherwise, just jack up both sides of the front.


    Drain the oil

    Unscrew the oil fill cap and place it someplace safe.



    Cover the ground under the car if you have not already done so. If you're using rubber gloves, put them on.

    Take the 17mm socket, rubber mallet, and your drain pan and slide under the car. The bottom of the engine bay is covered with a plastic undertray but dead center is the opening for the oil bolt.



    Apply the 17mm socket and use the rubber mallet to knock it loose. Once it is loose, place the oil pan under the drain bolt so its leading edge is directly under the bolt and the rest of the pan is toward the rear of the car. Once oil starts flowing it will initially arc out of the pan before it starts to drip straight down, so you want to catch that initial surge.

    Continue to unscrew the oil drain bolt by hand until its completely off - try to keep it from dropping into the oil drain pan as it comes loose. If you drop it in, try and grab it quickly if the oil is not too hot. You'll want it so you can replace the crush washer.

    Now that the oil is draining, its time to work on the filter. Crawl back out from under the car with your tools and the drain plug. If you jacked the car up, you may want to drop it back down now while the oil changes and we work on the top of the engine.


    Replace the filter and seals

    Place the drain plug on your work surface - we'll come back to it later.

    The 3.8 V6's oil filter resides on the back of the engine by the firewall, but other than that, its easy to get to.

    Take the 27mm wrench or socket and rubber mallet and knock the cover loose. Once loose, continue to unscrew the cover. It took me around 16-17 1/4 turns to get it so I could loosen it by hand.



    Once the cover is free, carefully lift it up and out of the engine. Note it will be oily so you may want a shop rag to catch any drip. Place the cartridge on your work surface.



    Open your new filter and makes sure all the parts are accounted for. The Hyundai filter comes with a filter, crush washer, and three o-rings of different sizes. For the V6, we don't need the V8 o-ring.



    Remove the old filter from the cartridge by tugging on it. Its only held on by friction, but being covered in oil, it can be slick. Make sure the old filter and new filter look identical and have the same part numbers. Note that Hyundai has changed the part number a few times in the past.

    If your new filter looks good, proceed by removing the rubber o-rings from the cartridge. There is a large o-ring near the top of the cartridge and a small o-ring at the bottom of the cartridge stem.



    The top ring is easy to replace but the bottom ring can be tricky. The top ring you can pretty much remove and replace by hand. Use the #0 screwdriver, needle nose pliers or small prying tool to pop it off and carefully install the replacement. Dip your finger into your new oil and apply a coat to the two o-rings. This will keep them from binding to the engine.

    Now remove the old crush washer from the drain bolt. You might need the #0 screwdriver here as well to pop it loose. Place the new crush washer on the bolt.

    Pop the new filter into the cartridge. Push it firmly up so it pops in. If its not on enough, the cartridge will not screw back into the engine.

    Place the cartridge with the new filter back into the engine. Hand tighten, then screw down until seated. Torque it to 18.4 lb ft.


    Replace the oil

    Get back under the car and hand tighten the drain bolt into the oil pan. Slide the now full oil drain pan out of the way and torque the drain bolt to 30 lb ft. Slide the full oil drain pan out from under the car and set it aside somewhere out of the way.

    Place your funnel into the oil fill neck, and fill the engine with 5 quarts of your chosen engine oil.

    Remove the funnel and place the cap on the oil filler neck. Start the car and idle it for a minute to circulate the oil. Shut the car off - if you quickly check the dipstick, you should see that the oil level is a half-quart low. As the engine sits, oil from the engine drains into the pan and raises the reading.

    Based on your readings, add up to an additional 0.5 qt to the engine for 5.5 qt total.
    Remember, as much as you don't want to be too low on oil, nor do you want to have too much oil! The owner's manual calls for 5.5 qts of oil, which what we'll be putting in. Double check that no oil is leaking from the drain bolt or cartridge.

    If everything is good, replace the engine cover. I find its easiest to start on the driver's side to align and push down on the cover, then tug the passenger side into place.



    Make sure all your tools are accounted for, and close the hood. Place the old oil into the new oil containers and take it to a place that will properly dispose of it, like Wal-Mart, Sears, Autozone, et al.

    Life's too short to drive boring cars.


  2. #2
    TJPark01's Avatar
    TJPark01 is offline Been here awhile... What I drive: 4.6 V8 Tau Sedan
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    Default Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

    Sweet
    4.6 Platinum Metallic/Black

  3. #3
    TNTitan's Avatar
    TNTitan is offline Registered Member What I drive: 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Default Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

    Wow. serious writeup for an oil change.

    Good work.

  4. #4
    Drinker is offline Hasn't posted much yet... What I drive: 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Default Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

    Great post. Just what I was looking for!

  5. #5
    ShoNuff is offline Registered Member What I drive: Genesis 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Thumbs up Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

    Nice write-up. Thanks for taking the time to put this together.
    I believe that the invention of the DVR is proof that some supreme deity exists.

  6. #6
    darrell is offline Registered Member What I drive: Genesis 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Default Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

    Thanks for the very nice write up.

  7. #7
    hobibill is offline Hasn't posted much yet... What I drive: 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Default Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

    Saw this back in October 2010 when I first got my Genesis. This is my first chance to use it. Thanks for the write up...it's always better to know up front what your getting into.

  8. #8
    CLTCMB is offline Hasn't posted much yet... What I drive: 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Default Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

    There was an old thread discussing the oil level indicator on the dip stick and that it showed overilled with the prescribed 5.3 quarts. I've got a 2011 and just experienced that on my first oil change -- overfill indicated with just 5 quarts in. Any new info? Is this still "normal?"

  9. #9
    upsbroke is offline Registered Member What I drive: Genesis 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Default Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

    Forgive me- I'm new to this site. Being also a VW fan-I also see the VW people using oil evacuators such as the Mityvac 7400. It allows you to suck out the oil through the dipstick hole through a tube that reaches to the bottom of the oil pan. This saves any problems with overtightening bolts and destroying oil pan threads. Again- I don't know if this applies to Hyundai but alot of the VW guys like it. My only downside is that when you pull the oil pan plug-you get everything.
    It's also real nice for syphoning gas, etc. I have a 56 Ford pickup and I use it for my "spare" gas can for my lawnmowers. Sure works great!

  10. #10
    Mark_888 is online now Registered Member What I drive: 1G Genesis 3.8 V6 Sedan
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    Default Re: Oil Change DIY - 3.8 V6 Genesis Sedan

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    Quote Originally Posted by upsbroke View Post
    Forgive me- I'm new to this site. Being also a VW fan-I also see the VW people using oil evacuators such as the Mityvac 7400. It allows you to suck out the oil through the dipstick hole through a tube that reaches to the bottom of the oil pan. This saves any problems with overtightening bolts and destroying oil pan threads. Again- I don't know if this applies to Hyundai but alot of the VW guys like it. My only downside is that when you pull the oil pan plug-you get everything.
    It's also real nice for syphoning gas, etc. I have a 56 Ford pickup and I use it for my "spare" gas can for my lawnmowers. Sure works great!
    I use a Mityvac MV7300 which uses a separate air compressor (not included) to build suction pressure. I have not had a lot of luck with hand pumps. I already had a small $100 compressor that I used for tires, etc.

    The MV7300 works well and actually gets more stuff out than a drain (if I move the hose around a little toward the end). Having the air compressor probably helps a lot in that regard.

    A lot of German cars are designed to use oil evacuators, not just VW.

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