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Genesis G70 Reviews

PD705

Hasn't posted much yet...
258
249
43
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Was that last spring/summer?
The video linked above was shot in the summer with one of our Montreal region press cars.

Here you are at Tremblant - looks like Spring was yet to "spring"...

View attachment 17780

I pulled the other pictures from various print reviews.
Yes, that's me at the wheel in that shot.

The launch was definitely cold despite being in early May. We were the very first cars on the track for 2018. Just two days before our event, we had heavy machinery clearing a 4' thick/200' long ice jam from the short back straight between turns 7 and 8.
 

PD705

Hasn't posted much yet...
258
249
43
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Was that the pre-production Prestige with Brembos?
Sure was. We beat that poor thing mercilessly. 100+ laps of Circuit Mont Tremblant and probably 200 autocross runs, many of at max speed with me or an instructor at the wheel giving guests ride-alongs. It was also used for a Forward Collision Avoidance demonstration with a pedestrian dummy maybe 50 times?

It still had brake left at the end and the car didn't miss a beat - no codes, felt tight as a drum at the end. The only casualties were the front tires, which were basically slicks.

http://instagr.am/p/BiZTe6BAAwH/
______________________________
 

Beefer

I’m faster
3,501
2,767
113
Richmond, VA
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Sure was. We beat that poor thing mercilessly. 100+ laps of Circuit Mont Tremblant and probably 200 autocross runs, many of at max speed with me or an instructor at the wheel giving guests ride-alongs. It was also used for a Forward Collision Avoidance demonstration with a pedestrian dummy maybe 50 times?

It still had brake left at the end and the car didn't miss a beat - no codes, felt tight as a drum at the end. The only casualties were the front tires, which were basically slicks.

http://instagr.am/p/BiZTe6BAAwH/
Who’s the giggler? Gets me every time!

Nevermind...I see it in the Instagram info.
 

KusaKusa

Registered Member
342
226
43
Genesis Model Type
No Genesis Yet!
Consumer Reports finally gave their evaluation of the G70. It's not pretty at first glance of the score, but if you delve into the review, they praise the driving dynamics excluding the 2.0T acceleration and braking distance. Otherwise, I think the score is simply a matter of how CR rates stuff like backseat space/comfort and weighs them in their road test score. Of note, it seems like they used regular fuel, so maybe that has an effect on acceleration performance?

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1548831238226.png

-------------------------

Here's text copy and pasted from the road test review:

The all-new Genesis G70 is a credible challenger to German sport sedans like the BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class. It is engaging to drive, well-equipped, and nicely finished. But it falls short on a few measurements that cause it to rank midpack among its direct competitors.

From the first mile, the G70 comes across as well-tuned, with a welcomed balance of performance, ride, and handling. The 252-hp four-cylinder engine has a willingness to rev, and it delivers power without delay. However, once we dug deeper, we found that it’s neither as quick nor as fuel efficient as its peers, and its stopping distances are a bit long.

On the street and our test track, the car is nimble, with an even-keel attitude through sharp turns and a good amount of steering feedback. Like many of its competitors, the G70 comes in rear- and all-wheel-drive configurations.

The quiet cabin is covered in upscale materials, complete with soft surfaces, leather upholstery, and detailed stitching. The comfortable front seat is shapely, with mild bolsters, helped by the four-way lumbar adjustments.
The controls are a model of simplicity, easy to read and operate. But the touch screen is far away and requires a reach, and the gear selector is unintuitive. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are well integrated.

As is the case with other sedans in its class, the G70's backseat compromises on space. It isn't roomy enough to comfortably seat average-sized adults, and it falls toward the tight end of the spectrum for the class.

Standard advanced safety features include automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, forward collision warning, blind spot warning, lane keeping assist, and driver-attention monitor.

The Genesis brand may not have the cachet of its decades-old rivals, but it is poised to gain ground on them, while undercutting those rivals on price.

Best Version to Get
With either engine choice, rear or all-wheel-drive, the Elite trim represents the best balance of luxury and price point. As such, it brings a sunroof, heated and ventilated front seats, rain-sensing wipers, and LED headlights.
Notable changes:
The new Genesis G70 is very similar to the Kia Stinger, but it has a shorter wheelbase.

Driving Experience
Powertrain
Acceleration in the G70 is prompt and turbo lag is barely noticable with the base 2.0-liter turbo four engine. However, measured acceleration at 7.8 seconds from 0-60 mph is among the slowest in the class. This is partly due to the G70’s weight, as it carries about a hundred pounds more than most competitors.
The G70’s fuel economy, at 23 mpg overall, trails the category. We were dismayed that the low fuel light only comes on with only 20 miles of range remaining. We think that’s cutting it too close, particularly on rural highways where filling stations can be few and far between. Most cars give drivers a warning with about 50 miles of range remaining.
The eight-speed automatic transmission shifts smoothly, but we wished that downshifts would occur sooner in some instances. The uplevel 3.3-liter turbo V6 engine is much brawnier.

Handling
The G70 is nimble and enjoyable to drive. It largely maintains a flat attitude through corners with little body roll, and the quick-responding steering gives commendable feedback. The steering effort is firm enough to feel confident at speed and light enough so that parking is not a chore. The more powerful 3.3-liter turbo brings a firmer suspension and 19-inch wheels.
The G70 was impressive on the track, and acquitted itself very well through our avoidance maneuver, where we simulate an emergency swerve around an object, posting a high speed of 56.5 mph. That’s sports car territory. It also instilled a great deal of driver confidence through the cones.

Ride comfort
The G70 rides comfortably. The suspension smooths out most bumps and keeps the car composed over undulations. Unlike its corporate cousin, the Kia Stinger, the G70 does not suffer from being overly firm.

Noise
The interior is quiet, with modest wind and road noise. The four-cylinder turbo engine creates a benign hum that’s largely unobjectionable. Overall, noise isolation compares well to crossed-shopped competitors.

Braking
The G70 produced long dry and wet stops for its class. That said, the pedal feel was linear and gradual.

Partial automation
Adaptive cruise control can be a stress reducer, as it maintains speeds and keeps a set distance to the vehicle in front. After reaching a full stop in stop-and-go traffic, drivers need to tap the gas pedal to resume progress when traffic starts to move again, unless it’s a very brief stop.

Headlights
Optional LED headlights (base trim G70s have halogen bulbs) provide a very bright, white light that does a good job of illuminating the road straight ahead and to the sides. Standard high beam assist, which automatically switches between low and high beams, helps drivers maximize high beam light as often as possible and avoids blinding oncoming traffic.

Inside The Cabin
Interior fit and finish
The G70’s cabin makes a great first impression, and that’s even before you consider its price advantage compared to its German rivals. It has an upscale look, with elegant controls, soft surfaces, leather upholstery, and detailed stitching. Most everything seems well put together, although some of the materials aren’t quite up to the high standards set by the Germans.
The padded material around the center stack, soft armrests, perforated door inserts, and brushed-metal trim all stand out. The felt-lined glove box and center bin are also nice touches, although the center armrest requires extra heft to lift it up or push it down. The leather wrapped steering wheel has a grippy, perforated surface at the all-important nine-and-three o’clock hand positions.
The perforated leather seats that come with the Elite trim look fancy, with nice stitching and contrasting piping.

Driving position
The driver sits low in the G70, yet the forward view is good. While some drivers felt a bit hemmed in by the G70’s cockpit-like feel, others thought it was fitting for a proper sports sedan. Armrests are nicely padded (though they lie on different planes), and the left footrest is well-placed. The center console intrudes with the driver’s right knee, but the area has some light padding. The power-adjustable steering wheel is a nice touch for the class.

Visibility
Outward views are good for a sleek sports sedan. The slim windshield pillars only get thick at their base, and the large side mirrors are mounted fairly low and mostly out of the way, despite their size. Big front side windows provide plenty of visibility, but the rear side windows taper quite a bit.
All G70’s come with blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning. Front and rear parking sensors come standard on our tested Elite trim.

Seat comfort and access
Getting into the front seats of the G70 is a bit of a chore since the seat is low and a stretch over the wide sill. The seat offers good support and adjustability, and it was well liked by our testers. Our car had power four-way lumbar adjustment on the driver’s side only. Climbing into the rear seat is more of a challenge. The low roofline requires a lot of ducking, and there is very little foot and leg room. Taller passengers will have issues getting in. Once inside, foot and knee room are limited, as is the head room for taller passengers. At least the seat is well shaped and supports a decent seating posture.

Controls and displays
The G70’s controls are clearly labelled and easy to find, but they aren’t perfect. The eight-inch touch screen is a far reach for tall drivers. The set cabin temperature only displays briefly on the screen while adjusting the temperature; we prefer when it’s displayed all the time.
The three large and grippy, silver-rimmed climate control knobs on the center stack have a quality look and feel, as do the metal-tipped infotainment buttons below the dash vents. The steering wheel’s buttons, knobs, and rocker switches all have a solid action.
The electronic gear selector is tricky to use, particularly at night. The Park button is on the same row as the R, N, and D, ahead of the R as if to imply that when the gear selector is all the way forward, it's in Park when in fact it is in Reverse. That could surprise drivers, but at least the car goes into Park automatically if the door is opened in Reverse.

Audio system
Most versions come with Lexicon brand 15-speaker stereo system that sounds good. There is no CD player.

Navigation
It is difficult to input an address into the factory-installed navigation system. For instance, after failing to find a specific address or a misspelled address, it does not offer a nearby alternative suggestion. That’s a common complaint for navigation systems in other Hyundai and Kia models. If programmed successfully, the navigation shows lane guidance and live traffic data via XM traffic. The map can be pinched or swiped to zoom in or out. Note that through the Android Auto and Apple Carplay compatibility drivers can view their favorite app-based navigation systems, making the factory system superfluous.

Phone
It’s easy to interact with a paired phone through steering-wheel buttons. A touch of the phone symbol on the wheel displays the recent call history on the center screen for the driver to choose from. Unlike some competitors, the Genesis unfortunately does not allow recent phone contacts to be shown in the cluster between the gauges.

Connectivity
Siri hands-free and Google assistance are supported. Drivers can use voice recognition for phone, media, radio, and navigation. Two USB ports (one for charging, one for playing) and an AUX port are in the front. One more USB charging port serves the rear. The Genesis Connected telematics service is free for a limited time. It enables owners to check the car’s location, gas level status, and remotely locking (or unlocking) or starting the car using a smartphone app. It also allows owners to set a dealer appointment for pickup and loaner drop off.

Climate features
The AWD G70 comes standard with heated outside mirrors, heated steering wheel, and a dual-zone automatic climate system. The Elite trim adds heated and cooled front seats. Everything worked well; our testers especially liked how quickly the seats warmed up.

Cabin storage
Front passengers have a large open bin located in the center console—a perfect spot to stash a phone. There’s also a covered storage bin under the padded armrest between the seats.

Cup holders
Front passengers get two cup holders behind the gear selector. Each holder has a grippy base and four plastic anti-tip measures to hold drinks in place. Rear seaters have two cup holders nestled into the fold-down center armrest. Only the front doors include built-in bottle holders.

Cargo area
A power trunk lid release and a hands-free feature lets owners walk toward the trunk with the key fob in pocket and wait approximately three seconds for the trunk to open. Some of us had no patience for that. A key fob button, and interior and exterior releases, will also open the trunk. The trunk has a wide opening, but it’s shallow, and that limits space because it’s hard to stand up most suitcases. The rear seatbacks fold to accommodate longer items, and there is a pass through door hidden behind the rear seat armrest.The trunk has a thick carpeted cargo mat and covered hinges. It’s almost fully lined, other than the upper part of the inner trunk. That said, speakers, wires, or rods are well concealed.

Spare tire
A temporary spare tire is standard across all trims.
Safety & Driver Assist Systems

Crash-test results
The G70 is rated as a Top Safety Pick Plus by IIHS due to an excellent performance in crashworthiness and front crash prevention testing.

Crash-avoidance systems
All the G70 models come standard with a suite of safety systems that includes forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking, pedestrian detection, lane keeping assist, blind spot warning, rear cross traffic warning and driver attention monitoring.
Forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection -- The system issues three levels of warnings to help prevent a crash. Each warning has its own audible and visual alert. In critical situations, the system will pre-charge the brakes to help the driver apply a greater braking force. If no action is taken after the final warning, automatic braking is triggered.
Lane departure warning/lane keeping assist -- Hyundai combines these two features and refers to them as Lane Keeping Assist (LKA). Both systems operates above 40 mph. To warn the drive of the vehicle leaving the lane. The lane departure warning system will give a visual warning and vibrate the steering wheel. The assist has two settings, Standard and Active LKA. The settings offer different levels of steering intervention. The Standard setting offers less steering control than the Active setting which provides frequent steering intervention and helps keeps the vehicle in the center of the lane. The switch for activating or deactivating all the features at once is in the left lower dash.
Blind-spot warning -- Like another set of eyes, blind spot warning systems monitor a vehicle’s flanks, indicating with a light in the side mirrors if a car is detected in an adjacent lane. It also provides an audible warning if attempting to move into a lane occupied by another vehicle.
Rear cross-traffic alert -- When in Reverse, the rear cross traffic alert system scans for vehicles approaching from either side behind and provides an audible and visual warning. This extra set of eyes is very helpful when backing out of a parking space.

Crash notification
G70 owners enjoy three years of complimentary Genesis Connected Care features, which include SOS emergency assistance.

Rollaway risk
The vehicle can rollaway only when the engine is shut off and the shifter is in Neutral. If the G70 is shut off while it is in gear, the transmission changes to Park automatically—a good safety measure, especially with the potential confusion with the gear selector.

Child safety
Child seat installations in the center seat were difficult to secure with the seat belt, as were some infant seats in the outboard seating position. Lower LATCH anchors are a little deep in the pockets but still accessible. Booster kids in the outboard seats will most likely not be able to access the buckle to fasten themselves in. In the center seat, they will need two hands to buckle themselves. If using a booster in the center seat, the head restraint will likely need to be removed and use of the either outboard seating position will be prohibited. Three car seats will most likely not fit across this rear seat.
 

Patent1

Registered Member
26
30
13
Northern Virginia, USA
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
I am also a bit disappointed by the CR review. Generally I value their opinion as a counterweight to the fevered motorjournalists at the car mags.
I believe the Consumer Report's rating and review would be more positive had they tested one of the 3.3T models, at least with respect to acceleration.
The braking criticism seems overblown when you look at the actual data - the car was within a few feet of both competitors.
The other areas where the G70 was penalized (rear seat access and comfort) are not that important to me personally.
 

EdP

Supporting Member
SUSTAINING MEMBER
4,986
1,768
113
Parrish, FL
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G80
Consumer Reports finally gave their evaluation of the G70. It's not pretty at first glance of the score, but if you delve into the review, they praise the driving dynamics excluding the 2.0T acceleration and braking distance. Otherwise, I think the score is simply a matter of how CR rates stuff like backseat space/comfort and weighs them in their road test score. Of note, it seems like they used regular fuel, so maybe that has an effect on acceleration performance?

View attachment 17837

View attachment 17836

View attachment 17838

View attachment 17839

View attachment 17840

-------------------------

.
Interesting once you look at the numbers. The back seat legroom is not much different than others though the shoulder room is a bit narrower. If you have a couple of 10 year olds, no problem but a couple of 6'4" football players would not like it. They did downgrade the comfort quite a bit.

If you could change the weight of each rating to what is important for you, it potentially could change quite a bit to the positive. The 2.0 performance is adequate, but if that is a big factor for your driving, go for the 3.3 and it would blow away the others.
Thanks for posting it.
______________________________
 

TurtleBoy

SUPPORTING MEMBER
2,150
1,595
113
Colorado
Genesis Model Type
No Genesis Yet!

NLJ

Registered Member
1,678
874
113
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
I am also a bit disappointed by the CR review. Generally I value their opinion as a counterweight to the fevered motorjournalists at the car mags.
I believe the Consumer Report's rating and review would be more positive had they tested one of the 3.3T models, at least with respect to acceleration.
The braking criticism seems overblown when you look at the actual data - the car was within a few feet of both competitors.
The other areas where the G70 was penalized (rear seat access and comfort) are not that important to me personally.
That's a Subaru loving site. Anyway take their opinions with a grain of salt. They don't judge cars for what it actually is but based on their ideals. They overlook certain things on certain brands but ding other brands for it.
 

Beefer

I’m faster
3,501
2,767
113
Richmond, VA
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Consumer Reports finally gave their evaluation of the G70. It's not pretty at first glance of the score, but if you delve into the review, they praise the driving dynamics excluding the 2.0T acceleration and braking distance. Otherwise, I think the score is simply a matter of how CR rates stuff like backseat space/comfort and weighs them in their road test score. Of note, it seems like they used regular fuel, so maybe that has an effect on acceleration performance?

View attachment 17837

View attachment 17836

View attachment 17838

View attachment 17839

View attachment 17840

-------------------------

Here's text copy and pasted from the road test review:

The all-new Genesis G70 is a credible challenger to German sport sedans like the BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class. It is engaging to drive, well-equipped, and nicely finished. But it falls short on a few measurements that cause it to rank midpack among its direct competitors.

From the first mile, the G70 comes across as well-tuned, with a welcomed balance of performance, ride, and handling. The 252-hp four-cylinder engine has a willingness to rev, and it delivers power without delay. However, once we dug deeper, we found that it’s neither as quick nor as fuel efficient as its peers, and its stopping distances are a bit long.

On the street and our test track, the car is nimble, with an even-keel attitude through sharp turns and a good amount of steering feedback. Like many of its competitors, the G70 comes in rear- and all-wheel-drive configurations.

The quiet cabin is covered in upscale materials, complete with soft surfaces, leather upholstery, and detailed stitching. The comfortable front seat is shapely, with mild bolsters, helped by the four-way lumbar adjustments.
The controls are a model of simplicity, easy to read and operate. But the touch screen is far away and requires a reach, and the gear selector is unintuitive. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are well integrated.

As is the case with other sedans in its class, the G70's backseat compromises on space. It isn't roomy enough to comfortably seat average-sized adults, and it falls toward the tight end of the spectrum for the class.

Standard advanced safety features include automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, forward collision warning, blind spot warning, lane keeping assist, and driver-attention monitor.

The Genesis brand may not have the cachet of its decades-old rivals, but it is poised to gain ground on them, while undercutting those rivals on price.

Best Version to Get
With either engine choice, rear or all-wheel-drive, the Elite trim represents the best balance of luxury and price point. As such, it brings a sunroof, heated and ventilated front seats, rain-sensing wipers, and LED headlights.
Notable changes:
The new Genesis G70 is very similar to the Kia Stinger, but it has a shorter wheelbase.

Driving Experience
Powertrain
Acceleration in the G70 is prompt and turbo lag is barely noticable with the base 2.0-liter turbo four engine. However, measured acceleration at 7.8 seconds from 0-60 mph is among the slowest in the class. This is partly due to the G70’s weight, as it carries about a hundred pounds more than most competitors.
The G70’s fuel economy, at 23 mpg overall, trails the category. We were dismayed that the low fuel light only comes on with only 20 miles of range remaining. We think that’s cutting it too close, particularly on rural highways where filling stations can be few and far between. Most cars give drivers a warning with about 50 miles of range remaining.
The eight-speed automatic transmission shifts smoothly, but we wished that downshifts would occur sooner in some instances. The uplevel 3.3-liter turbo V6 engine is much brawnier.

Handling
The G70 is nimble and enjoyable to drive. It largely maintains a flat attitude through corners with little body roll, and the quick-responding steering gives commendable feedback. The steering effort is firm enough to feel confident at speed and light enough so that parking is not a chore. The more powerful 3.3-liter turbo brings a firmer suspension and 19-inch wheels.
The G70 was impressive on the track, and acquitted itself very well through our avoidance maneuver, where we simulate an emergency swerve around an object, posting a high speed of 56.5 mph. That’s sports car territory. It also instilled a great deal of driver confidence through the cones.

Ride comfort
The G70 rides comfortably. The suspension smooths out most bumps and keeps the car composed over undulations. Unlike its corporate cousin, the Kia Stinger, the G70 does not suffer from being overly firm.

Noise
The interior is quiet, with modest wind and road noise. The four-cylinder turbo engine creates a benign hum that’s largely unobjectionable. Overall, noise isolation compares well to crossed-shopped competitors.

Braking
The G70 produced long dry and wet stops for its class. That said, the pedal feel was linear and gradual.

Partial automation
Adaptive cruise control can be a stress reducer, as it maintains speeds and keeps a set distance to the vehicle in front. After reaching a full stop in stop-and-go traffic, drivers need to tap the gas pedal to resume progress when traffic starts to move again, unless it’s a very brief stop.

Headlights
Optional LED headlights (base trim G70s have halogen bulbs) provide a very bright, white light that does a good job of illuminating the road straight ahead and to the sides. Standard high beam assist, which automatically switches between low and high beams, helps drivers maximize high beam light as often as possible and avoids blinding oncoming traffic.

Inside The Cabin
Interior fit and finish
The G70’s cabin makes a great first impression, and that’s even before you consider its price advantage compared to its German rivals. It has an upscale look, with elegant controls, soft surfaces, leather upholstery, and detailed stitching. Most everything seems well put together, although some of the materials aren’t quite up to the high standards set by the Germans.
The padded material around the center stack, soft armrests, perforated door inserts, and brushed-metal trim all stand out. The felt-lined glove box and center bin are also nice touches, although the center armrest requires extra heft to lift it up or push it down. The leather wrapped steering wheel has a grippy, perforated surface at the all-important nine-and-three o’clock hand positions.
The perforated leather seats that come with the Elite trim look fancy, with nice stitching and contrasting piping.

Driving position
The driver sits low in the G70, yet the forward view is good. While some drivers felt a bit hemmed in by the G70’s cockpit-like feel, others thought it was fitting for a proper sports sedan. Armrests are nicely padded (though they lie on different planes), and the left footrest is well-placed. The center console intrudes with the driver’s right knee, but the area has some light padding. The power-adjustable steering wheel is a nice touch for the class.

Visibility
Outward views are good for a sleek sports sedan. The slim windshield pillars only get thick at their base, and the large side mirrors are mounted fairly low and mostly out of the way, despite their size. Big front side windows provide plenty of visibility, but the rear side windows taper quite a bit.
All G70’s come with blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning. Front and rear parking sensors come standard on our tested Elite trim.

Seat comfort and access
Getting into the front seats of the G70 is a bit of a chore since the seat is low and a stretch over the wide sill. The seat offers good support and adjustability, and it was well liked by our testers. Our car had power four-way lumbar adjustment on the driver’s side only. Climbing into the rear seat is more of a challenge. The low roofline requires a lot of ducking, and there is very little foot and leg room. Taller passengers will have issues getting in. Once inside, foot and knee room are limited, as is the head room for taller passengers. At least the seat is well shaped and supports a decent seating posture.

Controls and displays
The G70’s controls are clearly labelled and easy to find, but they aren’t perfect. The eight-inch touch screen is a far reach for tall drivers. The set cabin temperature only displays briefly on the screen while adjusting the temperature; we prefer when it’s displayed all the time.
The three large and grippy, silver-rimmed climate control knobs on the center stack have a quality look and feel, as do the metal-tipped infotainment buttons below the dash vents. The steering wheel’s buttons, knobs, and rocker switches all have a solid action.
The electronic gear selector is tricky to use, particularly at night. The Park button is on the same row as the R, N, and D, ahead of the R as if to imply that when the gear selector is all the way forward, it's in Park when in fact it is in Reverse. That could surprise drivers, but at least the car goes into Park automatically if the door is opened in Reverse.

Audio system
Most versions come with Lexicon brand 15-speaker stereo system that sounds good. There is no CD player.

Navigation
It is difficult to input an address into the factory-installed navigation system. For instance, after failing to find a specific address or a misspelled address, it does not offer a nearby alternative suggestion. That’s a common complaint for navigation systems in other Hyundai and Kia models. If programmed successfully, the navigation shows lane guidance and live traffic data via XM traffic. The map can be pinched or swiped to zoom in or out. Note that through the Android Auto and Apple Carplay compatibility drivers can view their favorite app-based navigation systems, making the factory system superfluous.

Phone
It’s easy to interact with a paired phone through steering-wheel buttons. A touch of the phone symbol on the wheel displays the recent call history on the center screen for the driver to choose from. Unlike some competitors, the Genesis unfortunately does not allow recent phone contacts to be shown in the cluster between the gauges.

Connectivity
Siri hands-free and Google assistance are supported. Drivers can use voice recognition for phone, media, radio, and navigation. Two USB ports (one for charging, one for playing) and an AUX port are in the front. One more USB charging port serves the rear. The Genesis Connected telematics service is free for a limited time. It enables owners to check the car’s location, gas level status, and remotely locking (or unlocking) or starting the car using a smartphone app. It also allows owners to set a dealer appointment for pickup and loaner drop off.

Climate features
The AWD G70 comes standard with heated outside mirrors, heated steering wheel, and a dual-zone automatic climate system. The Elite trim adds heated and cooled front seats. Everything worked well; our testers especially liked how quickly the seats warmed up.

Cabin storage
Front passengers have a large open bin located in the center console—a perfect spot to stash a phone. There’s also a covered storage bin under the padded armrest between the seats.

Cup holders
Front passengers get two cup holders behind the gear selector. Each holder has a grippy base and four plastic anti-tip measures to hold drinks in place. Rear seaters have two cup holders nestled into the fold-down center armrest. Only the front doors include built-in bottle holders.

Cargo area
A power trunk lid release and a hands-free feature lets owners walk toward the trunk with the key fob in pocket and wait approximately three seconds for the trunk to open. Some of us had no patience for that. A key fob button, and interior and exterior releases, will also open the trunk. The trunk has a wide opening, but it’s shallow, and that limits space because it’s hard to stand up most suitcases. The rear seatbacks fold to accommodate longer items, and there is a pass through door hidden behind the rear seat armrest.The trunk has a thick carpeted cargo mat and covered hinges. It’s almost fully lined, other than the upper part of the inner trunk. That said, speakers, wires, or rods are well concealed.

Spare tire
A temporary spare tire is standard across all trims.
Safety & Driver Assist Systems

Crash-test results
The G70 is rated as a Top Safety Pick Plus by IIHS due to an excellent performance in crashworthiness and front crash prevention testing.

Crash-avoidance systems
All the G70 models come standard with a suite of safety systems that includes forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking, pedestrian detection, lane keeping assist, blind spot warning, rear cross traffic warning and driver attention monitoring.
Forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection -- The system issues three levels of warnings to help prevent a crash. Each warning has its own audible and visual alert. In critical situations, the system will pre-charge the brakes to help the driver apply a greater braking force. If no action is taken after the final warning, automatic braking is triggered.
Lane departure warning/lane keeping assist -- Hyundai combines these two features and refers to them as Lane Keeping Assist (LKA). Both systems operates above 40 mph. To warn the drive of the vehicle leaving the lane. The lane departure warning system will give a visual warning and vibrate the steering wheel. The assist has two settings, Standard and Active LKA. The settings offer different levels of steering intervention. The Standard setting offers less steering control than the Active setting which provides frequent steering intervention and helps keeps the vehicle in the center of the lane. The switch for activating or deactivating all the features at once is in the left lower dash.
Blind-spot warning -- Like another set of eyes, blind spot warning systems monitor a vehicle’s flanks, indicating with a light in the side mirrors if a car is detected in an adjacent lane. It also provides an audible warning if attempting to move into a lane occupied by another vehicle.
Rear cross-traffic alert -- When in Reverse, the rear cross traffic alert system scans for vehicles approaching from either side behind and provides an audible and visual warning. This extra set of eyes is very helpful when backing out of a parking space.

Crash notification
G70 owners enjoy three years of complimentary Genesis Connected Care features, which include SOS emergency assistance.

Rollaway risk
The vehicle can rollaway only when the engine is shut off and the shifter is in Neutral. If the G70 is shut off while it is in gear, the transmission changes to Park automatically—a good safety measure, especially with the potential confusion with the gear selector.

Child safety
Child seat installations in the center seat were difficult to secure with the seat belt, as were some infant seats in the outboard seating position. Lower LATCH anchors are a little deep in the pockets but still accessible. Booster kids in the outboard seats will most likely not be able to access the buckle to fasten themselves in. In the center seat, they will need two hands to buckle themselves. If using a booster in the center seat, the head restraint will likely need to be removed and use of the either outboard seating position will be prohibited. Three car seats will most likely not fit across this rear seat.
Couple of things...
You know you can just post a URL right? LOL
Next...CR should stick to fridges and baby seats. They know jack shit about cars.
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KusaKusa

Registered Member
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Genesis Model Type
No Genesis Yet!
Yeah the only performance related woes, the acceleration and braking, are both solved by the 3.3T. It's a shame they don't use that for comparison because in terms of price, the 3.3T is about the price of the 4 cylinders of the competition.

But if the 2.0T did take 7.8 seconds to get to 60, then I can understand the score for it; that's dreadful. Of course we have already hashed that conversation out, but do you guys think their use of regular gas affected the acceleration? 7.8 is significantly higher than even the high times we've seen before. It was likely cold during the test too since they test somewhere it snows, but wouldn't that help performance instead?
 
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