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Winter wheel & tire packages?

genericgenesis

Registered Member
55
23
8
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Tires only, no wheels... so I'm less worried about rust. 👍
I posted tire tote earlier in the thread (Amazon Sign-In). I think it’s convenient to store and carry your tiered and fairly cheap. I’d also recommend buying a cover (Amazon Sign-In) so animals (squirrels etc) don’t nibble on them.
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Falldog

Registered Member
144
165
43
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Late update, still been to lazy to test the pressure myself, but the numbers in the car have since updated to match what we put in after going for a proper drive.
 

Husky

Registered Member
474
400
63
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
After reading a few of the more recent comments did a quick BING search and this is the first article I found on storing tires.

Have to say I learned something.
Thanks for the link, I have to confess I've never thought to search for info on this topic. After doing so, I did find multiple articles from tire websites saying to store tires in a climate controlled area. Really?! I'm not going to lug all my tires down to the basement and back every six months.
Am I the only one who thinks these tips border on the extreme? Vacuuming air out of the bag? Ozone from a "nearby" motor (how close is that?) IMHO people are overthinking this. Every year for the past couple of decades I've stored multiple sets of summer tires in an unheated garage with no ill effects that I have ever noticed. In fact, my local tire shop keeps their whole tire inventory in a non-temperature controlled space above their garage bays.
If they were museum pieces I would understand, but these things do have a tendency to wear out when used.
It's actually during the warmer months that I notice a degradation, where the tread seems to disappear, presumably from friction against a rough surface 😂
In all seriousness, I wouldn't leave them out in the snow, or under a set of UV lamps, or in a room full of toxic vapors that I wouldn't breathe. But you'd have to show me scientific data to prove that storing them in my barn or garage is going to degrade or shorten their life in any meaningful way before I wear them out anyway in a few seasons.
 

Husky

Registered Member
474
400
63
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Haha.
Don't get me wrong, after dropping $1,000+ on a set of summer tires, I don't want to ruin them either. In fact, some of my friends might accuse me of having a tire fetish, since I seem to always be researching them, reading reviews or buying them. But the thought that storing them in my garage for the winter will damage them just doesn't pass the smell test.
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genericgenesis

Registered Member
55
23
8
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
Thanks for the link, I have to confess I've never thought to search for info on this topic. After doing so, I did find multiple articles from tire websites saying to store tires in a climate controlled area. Really?! I'm not going to lug all my tires down to the basement and back every six months.
Am I the only one who thinks these tips border on the extreme? Vacuuming air out of the bag? Ozone from a "nearby" motor (how close is that?) IMHO people are overthinking this. Every year for the past couple of decades I've stored multiple sets of summer tires in an unheated garage with no ill effects that I have ever noticed. In fact, my local tire shop keeps their whole tire inventory in a non-temperature controlled space above their garage bays.
If they were museum pieces I would understand, but these things do have a tendency to wear out when used.
It's actually during the warmer months that I notice a degradation, where the tread seems to disappear, presumably from friction against a rough surface 😂
In all seriousness, I wouldn't leave them out in the snow, or under a set of UV lamps, or in a room full of toxic vapors that I wouldn't breathe. But you'd have to show me scientific data to prove that storing them in my barn or garage is going to degrade or shorten their life in any meaningful way before I wear them out anyway in a few seasons.
Maybe I'm just neurotic because I actually moved my tires from a storage room beside the hot water tank (because the motor and ozone production....) but I do agree. I think for most people, most of the suggestions are ridiculous.

I'm not sure where you live, but if you live in Canada, most places have an option for storage for nominal amount ($60-100 CAD in my area).

Out of curiosity, do you do hard driving/racing? I wonder if that's when you would notice the difference in storage methodology. Anecdotally, most race series are very anal about tire temperatures. I don't think it matters much about storage if the tire has never been use (so it's fine for the tire shop you mentioned to store them that way) but I do think the chemical compound would be altered if they go from hot to cold. If I wasn't so busy with work and lazy, I can post links to chemical journals regarding this. Maybe I will if enough people care for the science....
 

Husky

Registered Member
474
400
63
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
I live in NH. We've got regular storage places of various sizes all over the place - just metal sheds on a slab basically. There are also some climate controlled storage buildings around, but I think they're pretty pricey. I was always looking at winter storage for my cars, not my tires 😉
Yes, in motor racing tire temps are certainly very important - while on the track, and I don't imagine they store the tires anywhere that's too hot or cold either.
In my younger days I had a car that I would take to a road course (Lime Rock), which was an absolute blast. Since those days, I've always planned to take my M3 to the track, but for a variety of reasons it hasn't happened. My son keeps bugging me to go autocrossing with him. We'll see - it eats tires.
I agree that if you were racing, and good enough at it that your times were very consistent, then maybe things like tire storage temp could become a factor. I think for most of us, the nut holding the wheel is the biggest factor by far. 😉
 

Husky

Registered Member
474
400
63
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
I have heard that the number of heat cycles is an issue with racing tires. When we dabbled in kart racing, the regulars would toss their tires (Dunlop racing slicks) after a certain number of races, regardless of wear, claiming that they weren't good enough after too many cycles. I have no idea if they were right, or how much of a difference it really made. In any case, this wasn't a winter storage issue. I got the impression it mattered more how many times they got hot, and then cooled, rather than how cool they got on one occasion.
It would be interesting to learn the science behind it.
 

Toddasaurus

REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!
2,254
2,723
113
Portland, OR
Genesis Model Type
Genesis G70
I'm telling ya, it's all pointless unless you're using R compound tires and/or you've got a set of tires specifically for the track. For normal everyday driving, it won't make any noticeable difference - just keep them covered and you're fine. Definitely overthinking this.
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