2015 Genesis Tech Package - Front turn signal bulb blown - LED Replacement?

sidewinder1

Getting familiar with the group...
115
24
18
Tampa, FL
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
looking back you installed them about a month ago so likely an outlier....but service thru sirius has been great so far so if they blow it will be covered under 1yr warranty.
 

wabbajack

Registered Member
28
17
3
I tried to work last weekend, but the access was too tight. I do not have electric tools, so I wasn't able to get the braces off the air box cleaners.
Also, half the clips were missing and my cover didn't line up great with all the holes. Should this be a concern?
______________________________
 

Suburbazine

SUPPORTING MEMBER
242
80
28
Louisiana
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)

carguy75

Registered Member
766
279
63
Atlanta, Georgia
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
I tried to work last weekend, but the access was too tight. I do not have electric tools, so I wasn't able to get the braces off the air box cleaners.
Also, half the clips were missing and my cover didn't line up great with all the holes. Should this be a concern?
My cover holes do not line up until I install most of the clips and then the last few clips actually forces the cover to align with the holes. The cover is really flexible. I usually install the inside clips first and then work my way out.
 

raw6464

Hasn't posted much yet...
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There's a simple resolution for this... turn off the worthless DRL and the 1157's last 10 years. The 1157's turn signal filament were never meant to be continuous running bulbs to begin with and Hyundai should have installed LEDs made for the job... on a $50K+ car.
 
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idlemind

Hasn't posted much yet...
64
14
8
Texas
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
I kind of feel like this issue deserves a recall. :rolleyes:
______________________________
 

carguy75

Registered Member
766
279
63
Atlanta, Georgia
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
There's a simple resolution for this... turn off the worthless DRL and the 1157's last 10 years. The 1157's turn signal filament were never meant to be continuous running bulbs to begin with and Hyundai should have installed LEDs made for the job... on a $50K+ car.
Well, actually the correct bulbs are 2357 bulbs which are the correct bulbs for DRL. 1157 may fit, but they dimmer and will not last long in the Genesis.
 

sidewinder1

Getting familiar with the group...
115
24
18
Tampa, FL
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
There's a simple resolution for this... turn off the worthless DRL and the 1157's last 10 years. The 1157's turn signal filament were never meant to be continuous running bulbs to begin with and Hyundai should have installed LEDs made for the job... on a $50K+ car.
turning off drl is not a solution since you lose auto function and also drl are not "worthless" and been proven to reduce chance of people running into you.
 

Gennadiy

New member
5
4
3
Genesis Model Type
No Genesis Yet!
I installed a set of Sirius switchback bulbs but the white never comes on, only amber. Did anyone get theirs to work properly? What do I have to do?
______________________________
 

Suburbazine

SUPPORTING MEMBER
242
80
28
Louisiana
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)

azgolfrat

Hasn't posted much yet...
10
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1
Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.

View attachment 12971
View attachment 12972
View attachment 12973
View attachment 12974

- - - Updated - - -

Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.

View attachment 12971
View attachment 12972
View attachment 12973
View attachment 12974
 

azgolfrat

Hasn't posted much yet...
10
0
1
John S, thank you so much for the great write up. We have a 2015 5.0; love it. However, the left front blinker had died three times in three years. The 1st two that went the car was under warranty, and the dealership here in Mesa/Chandler AZ told me each time the entire control module, headlight assembly was bad and had to be replaced. The 3rd failure, which was two days ago happened out of warranty, and I decided to see if I could fix it myself. I saw your post, got in there no problem, and EVERYTHING was exactly as you said. The plastic sockets are beginning to show signs of being burned ...I suspect they will go sooner or later. So, is it possible to purchase a double contact so, jump the power wire over to power up the 2nd contact and then get the use of both filaments and avoid the over heating?
______________________________
 
Last edited:

carguy75

Registered Member
766
279
63
Atlanta, Georgia
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)

azgolfrat

Hasn't posted much yet...
10
0
1
Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.

View attachment 12971
View attachment 12972
View attachment 12973
View attachment 12974

- - - Updated - - -

Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.

View attachment 12971
View attachment 12972
View attachment 12973
View attachment 12974
Excellent post! I have the EXACT problem as you described. Got nothing but shenanigans from the dealer on the two previous bulb burnout. Sigh. Why not jumper in a second power line and get some new sockets with two connections at the bottom? Thanks again for the excellent post.
 

Suburbazine

SUPPORTING MEMBER
242
80
28
Louisiana
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Last edited:

surprisinguy

Registered Member
371
72
28
NC
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
So you're saying the bulb listed in your link will work in the OEM sockets as DRLs and as a switchback bulb? So you're using the straight amber bulbs - anyone tried the switchback bulbs to see if they work or not in the OEM sockets?
 
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