2015 Genesis Tech Package - Front turn signal bulb blown - LED Replacement?

crossfire

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2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
There have been numerous updates to this project listed in other threads. Do NOT install load resistors as they are not intended for always-on daytime running lights. they will get dangerously hot.

the solution is to find LED bulbs that draw enough wattage to be sensed by the car's blinker relay, yet are durable enough to be used as running lights. These have worked for me so far:

CK Series LED Exterior Light-1157 Amber

Hello all, new to the forum. Bought my 2015 about 6 months ago and one of my amber lights went out. Literally just bought a $5 pack of replacements but saw a video about how quickly they can burn out being used as DRLs so I'm looking for other options.

I'm leaning towards the CK Series LED's referenced in the quoted post but I also saw these on the same site:


Would these switchbacks work without any additional modifications? I have seen posts about adding resistors and such, none of which I have any idea of how do.

Would the switchbacks work similar to the what dbbalch has installed with the exception of providing the white DRL functionality?

Thanks,
 

dbbalch

Registered Member
28
21
3
Maryland
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Hello all, new to the forum. Bought my 2015 about 6 months ago and one of my amber lights went out. Literally just bought a $5 pack of replacements but saw a video about how quickly they can burn out being used as DRLs so I'm looking for other options.

I'm leaning towards the CK Series LED's referenced in the quoted post but I also saw these on the same site:

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Would these switchbacks work without any additional modifications? I have seen posts about adding resistors and such, none of which I have any idea of how do.

Would the switchbacks work similar to the what dbbalch has installed with the exception of providing the white DRL functionality?

Thanks,
The socket Hyundai uses is a 1157-style socket, but it's only wired with a single power wire and contact point. So, it won't utilize the two functions (e.g. on/bright or white/yellow) of a true dual-function bulb. My guess is that you'll only ever see one of the switchback bulb's two colors.

I replaced my stock Hyundai "frankensockets" with standard 1156 sockets with longer lead wires that will allow me to pull the socket clear of the air cleaner box if I ever need to change the bulbs. The 1156 socket is a two-wire socket that matches the wiring of the car and the single-function nature of the light.

Full write-up here.
 
Last edited:

mgreenb561

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2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
I've had my 15 Genesis sedan for a few months and lost a signal bulb. I've read most of this really long thread....my take is that the plug is single prong and the bulb is 2 prong. Wouldn't it make sense to replace 1157 (2 prong) with 1156 equivalent (1 prong). Better contact (same base) should remedy plug failures down the road. If it has already been discussed, forgive me. I looked but did not see it

The other thing I'm getting is that I may or may not have hyperflashing; the fix should be to add a resistor. Is that correct?

ty
______________________________
 

mgreenb561

New member
12
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1
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.

View attachment 12971
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View attachment 12974

- - - Updated - - -

Lots of confusion on these blinker bulbs, and why they burn out so quickly.
Hyundai didn't help when they told everyone in their user manual that the replacement was a non existent "PY" LED bulb. The "PY" bulb doesn't exist and never has. (Maybe on a drawing board somewhere)
The original supplied Hyundai bulb is a double filament regular incandescent (old fashion) light bulb, a 2357, which crosses over to several similar part numbers. They all work.
They all work, and they all burn out relatively quickly. They do so because I believe the LED "PY" bulb was never developed, even though the car was designed for it...follow me on this.
If any of you do-it-yourself people take a moment and look INSIDE the light bulb SOCKET the next time you replace one. Your going to see a SINGLE electrical contact spring. The bulb you're putting in has TWO contacts at the base of the bulb. One for running light, one for blinker. Both contacts use the base of the bulb as power negative.

But the socket has ONE contact...DUH ???

Here is how the bulb is DESIGNED to work. One contact at the bottom of the bulb is for electricity (DC) + positive, the silver/brass base of the bulb is for electricity (DC) - negative
For the running light to work, the car should send power to ONE contact which goes through the filament, then to ground via the bulb base, and filament ONE lights.

For the blinker to work, the car should send power to the SECOND contact simultaneously, the power to the second contact goes through the SECOND filament and then to the shared ground via the same silver/brass bulb base.
TWO filaments lit at the same time makes the bulb brighter, and so turning the SECOND contact power on-off makes the bulb brighter - less bright - brighter - less bright. You now have a BLINKING bulb.

So how is Hyundai making a two filament/two contact bulb operate as designed, with just one contact? How are they turning on-and-off the second Blinker filament?
ANSWER: They're not.
Hyundai is using only ONE filament and simply pulsing a higher voltage to a single filament to get it to burn brighter. It's easily done. BUT NEVER DONE!!!! Why, because it means you're forcing the bulb to operate beyond its designed voltage. To do so will cause the bulb to fail quicker than designed. It will also cause it to operate much hotter than designed, which is why every owner who takes the time to look inside the bulb socket will see a socket that is charred black by excessive heat.
Attached at the bottom of this post are 4 images. 2 of the "cleaned" charred single contact socket, and 2 of the bulbs. The first is the burned black OEM bulb which shows what the excessive heat does the the bulb. The second is the replacement bulb.

This has to be an eleventh hour remedy by Hyundai for a single contact design that was meant for the mythical "PY" bulb that failed to be produced.
To re engineer the wiring harness for a conventional two wire would have taken time and money. New harness design, new (two contact) bulb socket, reprogramming the electronic power distribution program, and possibly production delays. No way this would happen. We as owners will never know the full story of what happened here. But here is what we're left to deal with.

The bulbs will continue to burn out once or twice a year.
Replace them as a set. Unless your putting in EXACTLY the same bulb made by EXACTLY the same manufacturer, you'll end up with the problem above, which was one side being brighter then the other.
Keep an eye on the socket. I've only had my Genesis for two years, and the socket shows serious signs of heat deterioration. I know the socket will need replacement within another two years.
Is Hyundai responsible for these issues ABSOLUTELY! Will they install new sockets at their expenses as needed, not likely. A class-action on such a minor issue isn't likely unless the excess heat issue actually causes a few car fires which isn't very likely in my opinion.
I am upset that years later, they still never developed the "PY" bulb. If designed correctly, you can pulse an LED bulb with varying voltages without the same damaging effects.

As to all the people here installing LED substitutes. Virtually all the LED substitutes I've examined in the store are double contact bulbs. Meaning they will light TWO separate sets of LED's, one for running and one for blinking, just like I described above.
I can't understand how anyone is getting a satisfactory results with them. Unless designed to do so, pulsing a single bank of LED's with a higher than designed voltage, isn't likely to make a significant difference in brightness.

I tried a set of LED's from AutoZone hoping my suspicions were wrong. One wouldn't work at all, the other as I suspected, had a weaker blinker signal than the conventional incandescent bulb. I returned them for a refund.

I love my Genesis, but we've all been sold a defective design when it comes to the front blinkers/running lamps.

View attachment 12971
View attachment 12972
View attachment 12973
View attachment 12974
Shouldn't 1156 equiv (single prong) make it right
 

kibber

Registered Member
30
12
8
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Wouldn't it make sense to replace 1157 (2 prong) with 1156 equivalent (1 prong). Better contact (same base) should remedy plug failures down the road.
The bases are not really same, a 1156 would not fit into a 1157 socket, and our cars actually use the 1157 socket with one of the contacts simply removed. You'd need to either cut and replace the socket or fabricate an 1157-to-1156 adapter.

The other thing I'm getting is that I may or may not have hyperflashing; the fix should be to add a resistor. Is that correct?
You would not need a resistor if your LED bulb either has a CANBus chip (like SuperBrightLEDs 1157-A26-CBT which is a bit dimmer than the stock bulb or the currently unavailable Huizen 1157 LED), or is powerful enough on its own (i.e. close to 28 watts, which might cause overheating problems when used as DRL). It seems likely that the high-power 1156 LEDs are more likely to be designed to withstand constant use (DRL) than the 1157 ones, but I don't know for sure.
 

dbbalch

Registered Member
28
21
3
Maryland
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Shouldn't 1156 equiv (single prong) make it right
You can replace the factory harnesses with standard 1156 harnesses if you want to use 1156 bulbs. This is possible because the factory harness is a two-wire configuration that only utilizes one of the contact points on a 1157/2357 bulb. The light is a single function light (it's either on or it's off), even in DRL mode. No idea why Hyundai went down this path, but it is what it is. I can confirm that this works just fine as I did it on my car.

Full write-up on this here.
 
Last edited:

kibber

Registered Member
30
12
8
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
For anyone interested, the Huizen 1157 LEDs (5w, amber, brighter than stock, CANBus chip, no resistor needed for the Genesis) appear to be back in stock on Amazon.
______________________________
 

sidewinder1

Getting familiar with the group...
114
24
18
Tampa, FL
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
installed the sirius 1157 leds today and it works great with no hyper flashing. much brighter than pilot on the left. pilot has one of the leds fell off on the front. hopefully these will last and it will be a good test with summer coming up here in FL.

one thing to note is the pic on website shows 6 leds per side but one i got only has 4 and design seems to be significantly different. will email them to see whats up with that.






 

kibber

Registered Member
30
12
8
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
These look like the EK series. Any particular reason to choose these instead of the CK series that dbbalch used? As far as I understand, the only advantage of the EK Is that they're a little shorter, while the CK offers more LEDs (given the same wattage overall, that means lower load per LED) and aluminium circuit boards, both of which should potentially increase longevity.
 

sidewinder1

Getting familiar with the group...
114
24
18
Tampa, FL
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
These look like the EK series. Any particular reason to choose these instead of the CK series that dbbalch used? As far as I understand, the only advantage of the EK Is that they're a little shorter, while the CK offers more LEDs (given the same wattage overall, that means lower load per LED) and aluminium circuit boards, both of which should potentially increase longevity.
ahh didn't realize there were more...i ordered ck but received ek instead.. so ck has more leds (21 vs 13) so wouldn't that mean its brighter and pull higher wattage? i.e. power draw per led would be fixed and adding more led = brighter? btw, both have aluminum body and circuit board.
 

kibber

Registered Member
30
12
8
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
ahh didn't realize there were more...i ordered ck but received ek instead.. so ck has more leds (21 vs 13) so wouldn't that mean its brighter and pull higher wattage? i.e. power draw per led would be fixed and adding more led = brighter? btw, both have aluminum body and circuit board.
Ah you're right, they do both have aluminium circuit board indeed. As far as brightness, both are spec'd the same, and are supposed to have the same wattage, which would imply lower wattage per LED in the CK. Power per LED is not actually a fixed value, the less power you run through a given LED, the less heat it would produce and that would also make it more efficient in producing light.
______________________________
 

sidewinder1

Getting familiar with the group...
114
24
18
Tampa, FL
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
Looks good - how did you get the broken led out of your light that fell off?
thanks ... first tried a pick up tool but couldn't maneuver it inside the housing as the shaft is flexible.... had to use a wire with duct tape on the end fashioned into a sticky pick up tool. angled wire on the end so i could maneuver it in the housing. came out easier than i thought it would.
 

kibber

Registered Member
30
12
8
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
also bought these as backup. looks very similar to the sirius ck series except 3030 leds instead 2835.
The description says "Theory Power :21W per LED Bulb, Real Power:About 5W per LED Bulb", and there's no CANBus chip. Not sure what "theory power" means, but at 5W they're likely to hyperblink. Please post how they work out!
______________________________
 

sidewinder1

Getting familiar with the group...
114
24
18
Tampa, FL
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
will do...also got a reply from sirius led about the mixup and they are sending out the ck series and will not need to ship the ek back. good customer service...so looks like i'm set for couple years...hopefully ;)
 

mgreenb561

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1
Genesis Model Type
2G Genesis Sedan (2015-2016)
also bought these as backup. looks very similar to the sirius ck series except 3030 leds instead 2835. there is also a $3 off $3+ coupon today which makes it $9 for pair shipped. coupon code PERFECT3 works on any ebay item.

P21W LED P21/5W T20 W21/5W 21SMD Car Light Bulb 7443 1156 BA15S 1157 BAY15D 3157 | eBay
Following. Just ordered yesterday the SiriusLED 1157CK - appears to be 600lm vs this is 1200lm. Not that their measurements have accuracy at all - still should be 2x as bright as original

I am hoping for no hyperflashing; i really don't want to have to put in resistors. I have read about changing flasher relay to a LED flasher. (If necessary) thinking it might generate less heat, and if (haven't found it yet) it is under hood, would be less confined to dissipate heat.
 

Suburbazine

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228
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Genesis Model Type
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